Obligatory Blizzcon post

Blizzcon starts tomorrow, officially. It will be the eleventh such event since the first one in 2005 (the 2012 event was cancelled), and it is Blizz’s 25th anniversary year. If you haven’t yet checked out the schedule and want to, Wowhead has a good summary of events here.

I am almost always interested in what happens at Blizzcon, but only in a peripheral way. I am not really a convention type person, and even if I were, I can’t imagine myself shelling out the money to attend this particular event, either in person or virtually. I am glad there are people who do enjoy the experience, but I am just not one of them. I am not sure why this is, but my armchair self-analysis tells me it has to do with keeping my virtual game escapism completely separate from the harsher realities and complexities of the real world.

All that said, I will be following some of the Blizzcon events through delayed videos and the tweets and other reporting from those there. Like most people, I am not expecting any big WoW announcements. Legion is barely started, so it is way too soon to even think about a next expansion — the most we might expect in terms of concrete announcements is some idea of the scope and possibly timing of Patch 7.2.

The scheduled events I find most interesting are always the dev talks, along with the usual spate of “exclusive” interviews granted to various gaming media. Often, by stringing together common themes and odd comments made during these, it is possible to glean some wisp of a glimmer of Blizz’s game plans and/or true intentions. Over the past couple of years Blizz has clamped down on both the message and the messengers in interactions with the player base, but there is still hard information to be had if you know how to parse the communications.

There are really only three Warcraft panels with the potential for non-fluff content: the “Legion — What’s Next” today, and the “Legion — Design Retrospective” and Q&A panels tomorrow. I fully expect the What’s Next panel to be a unicorn-and-puppies-and-rainbows picture of upcoming raids, more Suramar quest lines, general timelines for patches, mention of world quests, and plans for class halls and artifact weapons. For the latter, expect an extension of the class hall campaigns as well as an expansion of the artifact trait tables.

For the design retrospective tomorrow, I expect a lot of self-congratulations about how awesome the Legion design has been, which is fair, but I would also like to see some admission that some designs have had unintended and in some cases far-reaching consequences, along with some thought on whether those consequences are good or bad for the game. Among them:

  • Professions.
  • The time burden imposed on alts by class hall and artifact requirements every character must perform in order to do almost any aspect of Legion’s end game.
  • The centrality of Mythic and Mythic+ dungeons, especially in relation to players not in guilds that are active enough to run these regularly.
  • The wisdom of making one single piece of gear — the artifact weapon — absolutely central to every aspect of an entire expansion.
  • Somewhat in line with the above points, a consideration of the theory that recent design decisions (reliance on end game advanced raids and dungeons, time required to be spent for character progression, etc.) have made the game less friendly to casual players.
  • The decision to add two new melee classes/specs to an already overcrowded space.
  • Suramar — especially the absolute gating of quest lines behind faction rep, and the focus on enabling addiction that is central to the story line.
  • Class design and constant redesign every expansion. Of course, I focus on hunters, but there are plenty of classes that have legitimate design concerns. Mainly, I would love to see an honest discussion of the design reasons for major reworks of classes (except of course mages, the third rail of WoW) nearly every expansion, and an assessment of whether or not this improves the game.

For the Q&A session, I have no clue. By definition, the attendees are extreme fans of the game, so there is likely to be a mix of fawning softball questions and emotionally outraged ones. Still, there is the potential for some actual information to emerge from the session. Often these sessions produce at least one “I can’t believe he went there” type question. If there is one this year, I am betting it will have to do with vanilla servers, still an emotional point with some players, and one Blizz has specifically said they will not address at this year’s Blizzcon.

Short post today, expecting another glorious fall weekend in Virginia, so I am off to enjoy it. Whatever you are doing this weekend, enjoy!

About Fiannor
I have a day job but escape by playing WoW. I love playing a hunter, and my Lake Wobegonian goal is to become "above average" at it.

2 Responses to Obligatory Blizzcon post

  1. kennethdavis18 says:

    OMFG OMFG I read on WoWheads converge of Blizzcon that they actually addressed overall unhappiness with some class mechanics and play style in legion, and specifically mentioned hunters by saying…wait for it….wait for it…HUNTERS ARE GETTING TRAPS BACK!!!!

    FINALLY!!!!!

    I declare victory, or at least partial victory…or at least a step in the right direction…

    That is all.

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