Message on classes?

 

Yesterday, as I am sure you all know, there was another Blizz Q&A, this time with Game Director Ion Hazzikostas. I watched it live, then parts of it again this morning as I was munching my corn flakes. There were really no great revelations, and of course everyone will have their own take on it. If you want to check it out for yourselves, Wowhead has video of the entire interview and a nice text summary on this page.

In spite of the fact that we were told the Q&A is not the venue for discussing class balance issues, the one thing that struck me was a pretty defined thread of Legion class development weaving through many of the answers given to questions on varied topics. I think we are in the middle of a pretty significant swing on the entire philosophy of classes in WoW. That is not really news, I guess, but I do think we are finally seeing the emergence of a more or less clearly articulated set of class policies, which is something we have not had for some time now in the game.

The way I would express this policy is:

External game mechanisms are more important for determining class strengths than are individual player abilities, and those mechanisms should influence group compositions. 

Yeah, I know, but hear me out.

Gear. Gear level is the default measuring stick for all content in the game. Hazzikostas was pretty blunt about this when asked about the difficulty of the class artifact challenges in 7.2. He went to some pains to point out that the challenges were actually designed to get easier with better gear, and that player abilities could only go so far to beat the challenges absent good gear, and in some cases very specific gear.

However, in an apparent nod to player abilities (along with an obedient bow to the elitist mentality), he did add he is “confident that there will be a large number of people who just aren’t able to do [the artifact challenges]”. Yes, he used the word “confident”, which implies approval of the development. We don’t know whether he has this confidence because he also has confidence in the inept play of many players or because he has confidence in the fact that RNG makes getting decent gear unlikely for many players.

Nevertheless, the message was pretty clear: gear should matter more than almost any other factor.

External buffs discussion. This was eye-opening to me. The question being answered had to do with the wisdom of continuing to have external group buffs — of which there are currently very few. But Hazzikostas’s answer was quite far-reaching, I thought. It went far beyond the actual question, almost as if the question had been chosen to allow a public policy statement.

He first explained he thinks there should be more group-contributing type abilities, “not just numbers-driven ones”. I found this to be pretty amazing, considering Legion had gone to some pains to strip away almost all raid buffs.

He also expressed what I presume is the official Blizz stance on class value — that the game had veered too far in the direction of “bring the player not the class”, and that there is in his opinion significant value in bringing certain classes because of their unique group contributions. In fairness, he did point out that you can go too far in this direction, giving Sunwell Plateau as an example. But the message was clear: class should matter in group selection. He even went so far as to give the example of selecting a less-skilled warlock over, say “a third hunter”.

I admit I was annoyed that the only mention he made of hunters in the entire Q&A was to intimate there are too many of them, and that they are just generic damage dealers, but that is petty of me. And maybe I am reading too much into this, but it seems like he has completely forgotten that hunters used to be the premier utility class until under his watch nearly all utility functions were stripped from them. And now he has the nerve to imply hunters have no special utility and therefore should be replaced by a class that does have some??? OK, mini-rant over.

Anyway, I think this pronouncement is the formalization of the sea change in Blizz’s class development philosophy that we have observed evolving in Legion. I do not think it is overstating it to say that Blizz is moving back towards the idea of optimal class mixes for raids. In fact, he made this plain when he said (direct quote), “A well rounded group should always be the best one”.

Whether this will have any appreciable effect on non-elite raid teams remains to be seen. It seems unlikely, especially for flexible-sized difficulty levels. I suspect most semi-casual raid teams seldom run at the full 30 capacity, so if they have a few extra hunters (big fat raspberry to you, Mr. Ion “I Hate Hunters” Hazzikostas) it does not mean they can’t still add that oh-so-useful Warlock…

It will have an effect, I suppose, on Mythic raid teams, but many of those already configure their rosters based on class/spec contributions for specific fights. It could have an effect also on those non-Mythic teams who occasionally dip a toe into Mythic raids. I am thinking of my own guild, where just because of membership we frequently run with 4 or more hunters — if “proper” class mix becomes a thing, some of those hunters, regardless of their play abilities, could be asked to sit out if they are preventing a “useful” class from coming along. I think guild philosophy would supersede benching a regular raider solely because of their class, but if having a certain class mix is a clearly superior strategy, it could happen.

Another area that might be affected is pugs. Hazzikostas seemed to think increasing class relevance would be beneficial to pugs, because group leaders would not just be looking to grab the player with the highest ilevel. True, but it could also serve to really harm a class perceived to have no “special” contributions. Even if Blizz is forward-thinking enough to give every spec an identifiable beneficial utility, it could still backfire if that spec’s utility was not useful in certain fights — you might be able to get all the first wing Nighthold you could handle, for example, but no group would even think of picking you up for the second wing.

I often criticize Blizz for not communicating policy changes, so it is only fair that I hand them a kudo this time. Though it was subtle, I do think Ion Hazzikostas in the Q&A delivered a policy pronouncement on the role of classes in Legion and going forward: Gear and group utility (as handed out by Blizz in the form of unique class abilities) are significant pieces of class power, slightly outweighing player proficiency except in the most extreme cases, and it is desirable that these class attributes play a role in determining group composition strategies.

I may not agree with it, but I can’t argue that I have not been told about it.

Oh, and Blizz, please for the love of anything you may hold dear —

GIVE HUNTERS BACK THEIR RAID UTILITIES.

And have a good weekend.

 

Is quantity content?

Last night as we were cranking out our weekly H Nighthold farm run, there was a semi-lively discussion of Legion — mainly Patch 7.2 but also Legion in general. No great insights, but the comments did start a few chains of thought for me, focused on the whole idea of “content” that is Blizz’s main claim for Legion.

Patch 7.2 gave us a lot of new quests, no doubt about it, but beyond the one big “The Legion is coming, the Legion is coming!” story, there is not a lot to advance the expansion. The daily and weekly quests on Broken Shore are not much more than “Kill 20 demons/harpies/spiders or fill up this progress bar.” Ya, okay, there is a space ship, so that means we are dealing with interplanetary travel pretty soon — hardly a new revelation. And there is poor doubt-wracked Anduin, dithering and wringing his royal hands over whether or not he can step into his father’s boots. (I actually liked the Anduin quests, especially the last cutscene, but they were hardly significant in the Legion story. And for crying out loud, what rule dictates that every escorted NPC must walk as slow as my Great Aunt Dorothy?)

What I am getting at is that I see almost zero creative effort in the 7.2 quest lines. True, there are a lot of them — beyond the dailies and weeklies, every time you turn around you are getting yet another long ass quest line and achievement matrix for your order hall or your class mount or some artifact appearance or to advance your profession. Just my opinion, of course, but they seem to be longer and longer quest lines for less and less ultimate reward.

Even the time gates are uninspired, Blizz-controlled slow releases that do not begin to compare to the innovative player-influenced releases of Isle of Thunder in Mists, for example. Basically, we can do only what Blizz Central permits us to do, at the virtual pace of Anduin’s slow saunter. Oh, right, we do have the player-influenced BS buildings, but this is pretty much a sham, since their completion does not open up new content, only a couple of temporary buffs, and at least North America is now in the mode of a pretty steady and predictable rotation.

(One wonders what would happen if we all just stopped contributing to their construction — would we truly get no buildings, or would we get them anyway because who the hell knows if “player contributions” are just a cover story and the real “progress bars” are computer-generated automatic fills?)

When Blizz announced the Legion expansion, one aspect they stressed over nearly all others was that it would pretty much be a never-ending stream of “content”. This was, of course, a reaction to the perception that WoD had almost none of the “C” word. As I have noted before, content almost certainly means something different to every player. I think we are at the point where we can say that what it means to Blizz is “lots and lots of quests.”

In at least one case this has worked in Legion, I think. I was not personally a fan of the Suramar quests that unfolded during the weeks preceding the release of Nighthold (I just have a general objection to the whole drug-addict story line), but they were certainly creative, they significantly advanced a side story in Legion, they were relevant to the opening of Nighthold, and they continued long enough after the raid release to award a pretty cool mount. And while you were doing them, you could see the advancement of the story line. So while they filled Blizz’s “lots and lots of quests” content philosophy, they also engaged players and made us feel like we were personally guiding the story to its next major chapter.

It may be my unfamiliarity with WoW lore, but I find no similar unifying thread in the 7.2 Broken Shore quests. They are just variations on the “kill a lot of boars” theme. They seem like time fillers, not story advancers.

In the bigger picture, when you think about it, Blizz’s pre-Legion promise of lots more content — which I admit they have made good on so far — has turned out to be nothing more than their normal expansion plan stretched out by adding many more quest requirements to every aspect of the game. Legion’s basic blueprint so far is almost identical to WoD’s, except it has been designed to ensure that players who expect to achieve their game goals in, say, 6 months, now cannot achieve them in anything close to that time frame, because every goal in Legion has far more requirements — usually in the form of long quest lines or endless currency accumulation — than in any other expansion.

Is this “content”? Well, it’s not to me, but then again I do not write the game. Blizz has gambled that by making everything take longer for players to accomplish, by piling requirement upon requirement even for simple game goals, players will actively commit to the expansion until they meet these goals. Basically, Blizz is betting that players only complain of being bored when they have met their game goals and see no new ones on the horizon. By vastly stretching out the time necessary to meet any goal (for example, think of the “maxing out my weapon” goal some players have), Blizz hopes they can show their corporate bosses that they have licked the “boredom” complaint.

The danger here is that they hit a tipping point where people just give up on their goals because they see no reasonable chance of achieving them — certainly not in the time they feel they can commit to the game. For these players, the only remaining attraction of the game then becomes the “in the moment” enjoyment they derive from it. This is where uncreative masses of quests to “kill 20 demons” become a liability, because honestly you can only do that so often before being bored out of your skull. Add to this feeling one of betrayal that suddenly you can no longer meet your game goals in the same general time frame you are used to, and many will just stop playing altogether, exactly the same outcome as we saw in WoD.

It turns out you can have a boring expansion by letting players achieve their goals too quickly, but you can also have one by fostering a player perception that there is no hope of achieving their usual game goals at all and combine it with uncreative activities. It’s a delicate line to walk, but I see little evidence Blizz even recognizes there is such a line.  Certainly 7.2 does not indicate they do.

Mythic thoughts

OK, the thoughts in this post are not actually mythic in scope or depth, rather these are some thoughts about the mythic structure(s) in WoW. (Instances, not raids.) They have been rattling around in my brain for a while now, but began to coalesce only a few days ago when I suddenly acquired five new quests involving completion of five Mythic dungeons. The quests include three Mythics for an artifact appearance unlock (Step 10 of what appears to be an endless chain: Balance of Power), and two to unlock leatherworking craftable legendaries.

To be fair, I really don’t care much about either goal. I think all BM hunter artifact appearances stink, so I transmog my weapon into a cool bow anyway, and Blizz really does nothing to change the appearance of Hati, an integral part of the BM artifact weapon, as they have told us time and again, so really what’s the point. As for the LW legendaries, these are pretty much just stat sticks, and a huge amount of trouble and expense to make for something that will likely be replaced as soon as you get a “real” one anyway. I have seen them go for 300k+ gold on our auction house — it will be interesting to see how many of them actually sell at that price. I can’t fault the sellers for setting such prices, as the items are ridiculously difficult and expensive too make, but I suspect not many people will be willing to buy them at that level.

Anyway, this is not a post about legendaries or artifacts, rather about the Mythic systems in the current game. As I was mournfully reading over my list of 5 Mythic quests, it occurred to me that even getting into Mythic groups was going to be stupidly hard to do. Why? Glad you asked.

For one thing, players cannot get quest items from Mythic+ dungeons, they must be regular Mythics. I understand the reason for this — M+ runs are all about speed, which is why for example no mobs or bosses save the last one drop any loot. You really do not want players slowing down the group by hunting around for loot or quest items. But the thing is, it is nigh onto impossible to find a group running just regular Mythic dungeons.

I am in a great guild, very active, and there are quite a few people who chain run M+ dungeons every week. They even do a few charity runs for those of us who are not real fans of the genre, just so we can get that weekly +10 chest. But even in a guild like mine, very few if any are interested in regular Mythic runs at this point in the expansion. There were quite a few running regulars back when, for example, Balance of Power was a new thing, but now that most people who want it have finished it, procrastinators like me are kind of out of luck.

The only other option for completing these quests is to pug them.

HAHAHAHAHA! Sometimes I really crack myself up.

No, pugging is so painful in the current game that it is almost not an option at all. First, of course, you have to find a group doing a specific regular Mythic instead of asking for keys or doing speed M+ runs. If you are lucky enough to find a regular group for the specific dungeon you need, you must then contend with asshat ilevel requirements or even — ludicrously — AotC (yup, have seen it more than once, though for the life of me I can’t imagine what it has to do with Mythic dungeons). I am at ilevel 904 or thereabouts, and I actually do have AotC, but I am hesitant to apply to such groups because there is a way better than even chance they will be filled with assholes. Still, I do apply to regular groups when I can. This past week, on one night alone, I was refused 11 times even though I met every requirement laid down each time. It was kind of demoralizing. I gave up.

There is also the DPS penalty — if you are DPS you have a much worse time of getting into any group than a healer or tank, and even if you do get in, it takes orders of magnitude longer to do so. This penalty also plays out if you decide to create your own group — it takes a very long time to attract a tank to a group, if you can get one at all that is. Somewhat less time to get a healer, but you still pay the time penalty one way or another if you are DPS. To a lesser extent, this is also the case even if you are trying to get up a guild group — you basically have to beg your guild healers or tanks to join, because most of them are in such demand that they long ago finished up any regular Mythic instance quests, so if they join your group they will be doing so out of charity. In my guild, we actually have several tanks and healers who will do this, but I really dislike asking them because I know it is imposing on their good nature.

If I have a hard time completing these Mythic instance quests — for the reasons I just laid out — how much harder must it be for someone in a small or not very active guild or no guild at all? Or for someone with relatively “low” (870-890) gear level? My bet is, it is an almost insurmountable obstacle.

If Blizz wanted to fix this problem — if indeed in their pristine dev environment they are even aware it is a problem — they easily could. All they would have to do is make the quest item lootable from the final boss in each instance, and then even in M+ runs a player with the quest would get the item when they looted the final chest. There is nothing served, in my opinion, by making players run around and look for a quest item inside an instance. I get it that Blizz loves to require us to play a certain way and run dungeons no matter how we may like to play, but really what difference should it make if we run it and get the item after finishing it, or if we take the extra minute or two to scurry about and find it somewhere inside? We are still running the instance. But by adopting my suggestion, Blizz could expand the options for players wishing to pursue these quest lines.

If they wished to help players even more,

HAHAHAHAHA! There I go again, I gotta stop this.

Still, in a science fiction world where Blizz actually wanted to lessen player frustration, another improvement they could make in the Legion Mythic mechanic would be to add regular Mythic dungeons to the automatic group finder. Let’s face it, inflation has set in, and Mythic dungeons are now the equivalent of heroics in previous expansions. Why not make it easier for players to find groups by adding this level to the auto-queue (and also transporting the group to the instance and back when you drop group)? M+ is really the new Mythic, and you could leave it as it is, an invite-only group that assembles at the instance. But regular Mythics — yeah, Blizz, recognize what they have become, and lump them in with the rest of the instance levels. Set an ilevel requirement, or an achievement requirement, or whatever, to be able to queue for them, but allow the queuing. (And while you are at it, allow players to chain-queue for instances like we can do with LFR — it would go a long way towards lessening the DPS penalty.)

It just seems to me that, in an expansion where Mythic dungeons are required for nearly every end game activity or goal, Blizz should make them more accessible to players. They do not need to make them easier, just easier to access.

My 2 cents.

What a difference

After a week of flying, I am astounded at what a difference it has made in my approach to Legion. It’s like it’s not even the same game I have been slogging through for the past 8 months. I am actually having fun again, for the first time since maybe the second month of the expansion. I am not sure why this one ability should make such a huge difference in my outlook, but I think I can identify a couple of factors.

Time. This is certainly the biggest factor. It now takes me what I consider to be a reasonable amount of time to crank out world quests and daily Broken Shore quests. Just as an example, prior to flying I was spending close to an hour just doing the usual 4-5 BS quests, and now I spend 30 minutes or less. I don’t see such a dramatic change in the time it takes for WQs — probably because I am not especially efficient at planning out my quest routes — but it is still significant.

I don’t do my own flying everywhere. If I am going a long distance I usually still use the flight points. It’s just easier, and it gives me a chance to stretch, take a bio break, get a drink, put in a load of laundry, whatever. (But it is awesome to have the choice!)

The other aspect of the time factor is finally I am freed from the need to fight or outrun every little nuisance mob along the road. This alone saves a huge amount of time. And while I am at it, as a side rant, when did Blizz decide that sticking to roads was no longer a safe option? Now not only do mobs encroach on the roads, but they even block them, so that you cannot avoid fighting them or at the very least running like hell to get past them. (Thank you, Stonehide Leather Barding, possibly the single greatest craftable item from leather workers.) For years, Blizz has promised us that if we stick to the roads we will almost always be safe from hostile mobs. Now that they are delaying flying longer and longer in new expansions and forcing us to be roadbound, suddenly that rule no longer applies?

I spend almost no time now trying to figure out how to get past the many invisible walls Blizz has incorporated into the Legion terrain, especially in Stormheim, Suramar, Broken Shore, and Highmountain. I just fly over the area. It is glorious.

And Suramar City? It is absolutely great to be able to fly over those gangs of blue-circled thugs that account for so many deaths. Flying over them now, I often flip them the bird and cackle to myself. I no longer avoid WQs in Suramar City for that reason alone.

Alts. Mainly because of the time factor, I now feel I can spend some time several times a week on my alts, getting them to Broken Shore, doing world quests to gear up, and even venturing into LFR with them once in a while for the gear and the rotation practice. I still think Legion is the most alt-hostile expansion yet, but flying certainly helps a lot.

My alts tend to be a lot squishier than my main, of course — worse gear, plus I am not even close to proficient on them — so being able to avoid trash mobs helps me to focus on the quests more. Far from Blizz’s oft-expressed disdain for “avoiding” their annoying obstacles, flying actually encourages me to spend more time on my alts and thus playing the game.

Getting out of Dodge. I find many of the BS quests extremely unpleasant, not because of the quests themselves, but because of another ugly turn in game mechanics: Mobs that spawn as fast as, or even faster than, you can kill them, making it nearly impossible to leave the area even once you have finished the quest.

My main is a hunter, so there are very few things I cannot deal with solo, and these continually-spawning mobs are no exception. I can get to a safe spot then feign death, for example. Or I can just kill group after group after group after group until eventually there is a break long enough for me to escape. But it is annoying. Especially since Blizz still has not fixed the clunky problems with pet pathing and pet placement — these continuous mobs often mean I cannot loot at all since looting usually requires a kind of dance to get around my pet blocking the corpse, and spending the second or two doing this in these areas means another group has spawned and is attacking. And forget it if there are skins to be taken — not going to happen. No, it’s not a big deal, but it is terribly frustrating and annoying.

So having flying helps in escaping these areas, because if you can get the time to summon your flying mount (not always a given), at least you can be gone without having to run through dozens more of spawned mobs.

Gathering. On my gathering characters, I often fly from point to point, even great distances, just so that I can gather some mats along the way, even if it would be faster to use flight points for the actual trip. I don’t gather for sale, just to use the mats myself, but it still helps. (I think even flying does not help that much if you are a mat seller, unless you have level 3 gather for the mat it still takes a lot of time to get enough to sell in any decent quantity. This may account for why we have seen very little in the way of downward price movement for gathered items in our auction house.)

Fun. I sill get a real kick out of just hopping on a flying mount and swooping and soaring over an area. I love it when I see some little spot I have never before seen and can just set down and enjoy it. I like seeing the zones from a different perspective. I enjoy the art work far more, I think, when I can see it this way than when I am forced to slog along on the ground. I guess I just love being able to see the forests, and if I want to examine the individual trees I can do so on my own terms.

Freedom. This to me is second only to time as a factor in having flying. I feel like being able to fly restores some options to me as a player, some measure of play style freedom that Blizz has steadily eroded over the past couple of expansions. I have mentioned before that Legion more than any other expansion has put players into a virtual cattle chute for end game play, profession development, alt progression, and gear acquisition. There are just no options other than the Blizz-approved path to reach these goals. I have found this philosophy to be stifling.

Flying, by virtue of the fact that it gives us a third dimension for movement, seems to offer a metaphorical third dimension for some aspects of game play. It may be just an illusion that I feel freer to explore the game on more of my own terms, but if so it is a powerful illusion. I will take it.

And on that thought of freedom, it is time to begin the freedom that is the weekend.

Unscheduled break

Intermittent power and internet failures today — so no post. Back Friday (I hope).

Miscellaneous stuff

No big topic today, just a few incomplete thoughts about the game that have been rattling around in my head.

Flying. At last, over the weekend, I completed Legion Pathfinder Part 2. The long pole in the tent for me was getting revered with Legionfall Armies. I had lost a couple days questing the previous weekend (in-laws from hell), so I had been scrambling all week. I finished all available Broken Shore quests Saturday and was still about 50 rep points short, feeling a bit frustrated to be so close yet so far. Then I completed my class hall missions, and lo and behold my Valarjar rep mission got a bonus token, and it turned out to be for Legionfall Armies! Ta-da!

I was honestly expecting some final admin quests, like visit a trainer or watch a cutscene or something, to actually start flying, but no, as soon as I got the achievement my flying mounts magically began flying again. Nice. Also my alts had no problems, all of them were able to fly immediately, no bugs in the implementation that I could see.

And how glorious it is! I was surprised at how far it goes to lessen the perception of eternal grinding in the game. It really speeds up the world quest times, and it is luxurious to avoid all those “en route” mobs that dog you at every step, especially in Broken Shore. It is terrific to not have to wait for a whistle cooldown before you can leave a completed quest area (although I love the taxi whistle). It is great to be able to swoop down on the way to another quest and gather a mining node or herb you happen to see. And it is just fun to see the zones from another perspective, to get an idea of their size and layout from the air rather than the worm’s eye view on the ground.

I am not especially opposed to Blizz’s new pattern of waiting until a patch to get flying in a new expansion, and I don’t mind completing some achievements for it. But I do think flying should come in the first major patch, not wait until what is effectively the third one (7.1, 7.1.5, 7.2). Seven months of slogging along on the ground seems a bit much to me. Most of us don’t need that much “immersion”, thank you very much, to get the artistic flavor of an expansion.

Flying will also help a lot with leveling and gearing up alts. I was able to take one alt through the Broken Shore intro stuff and get some of the class hall upgrades yesterday in about 3 hours. And I took a couple others through 3 emissary quests each in very short order, including being able to pick up enough ore on one to get the two turn-in quests for level 2 mining. Flying alone will not fix the horrible paths to professions and alt gearing that Blizz has set up in Legion, but it definitely will speed some of the process.

Plus, it is great fun — an element that has been missing in the game for me lately.

Class Hall efficiencies. In addition to flying, some 7.2 changes in class hall mechanics help with alt development. I don’t spend a lot of time any of in my class halls, basically only go there for required progression. For example, I do as few champion missions as possible. But Blizz’s streamlining of things like order hall resources needed for research and time required for completion of various steps do help. Also, the speeded up paths for gathering massive quantities of AP are a welcome addition. In the last week, I have lept ahead quite a bit in my order hall chores on a couple of alts.

Honestly, part of my angst with the whole class hall thing is that I find it “nitpickily” complex. I have yet to get a sense for everything that must be done to get up to speed in a character’s class hall, and I have now six characters at level 110. But I still feel lost when it comes to know what next steps I need in order to get to an end game state in their class halls. Artifact research, order hall research, class questlines, class hall questlines to get the third relic slot open, figuring out the ways to get assistants for my champions, figuring out how to gear my champions (not all class halls offer the same options), figuring out what the “extra” perk is for each class and then remembering to use it regularly, etc. etc. Not to mention the confusing physical layout of some class halls — I still wander aimlessly in the warlock one every time I have to go there.

It’s just too messy and confusing. Please, Blizz, if you are not going to give us a guild hall or player housing in the next expansion, give up on the whole garrison mechanic. You tried. It didn’t work. Move on.

World quests. I still like these. I like that they give decent gear if you are just starting out. I like that most of them are relatively quick to do. I like that there is some variety in the game activities (PvP, professions, pet battles, raids and instances, standard PvE) you can engage in to complete some of them. I especially like that the emissary quests persist for three days, allowing those of us dealing with real life to take a play break once in a while and not miss any of them.

The only puzzling thing to me is why Blizz decided to abandon the WQ model for Broken Shore dailies. Now that I have flying, I am not so annoyed by this decision, but I still don’t understand the reasoning. I think WQs in general have been well received by most players, so I am not sure why Blizz would essentially regress for Broken Shore.

And while I am at it, after a couple weeks of demonic invasions in Legion, I am not feeling any more receptive to the timing mechanics of them. I have one more to do to complete all four for the achievement, and when that is done, I will be done with them too. I find them tedious and long. I think I would have liked them better if they had just been scenarios like we had in Mists, or if they popped up frequently like they did in pre-Legion and were essentially always available and quick to complete,  or if they were just specialized world quests (without the final couple of required quests and the scenario) that slightly advanced the story line. Honestly, I am not sure what one thing I don’t like about them, but I am decidedly not a fan and will not be doing them as soon as I complete the achievement.

Obliterum forge. For me, the best thing about 7.2’s change to the obliterum forge is not the fact that you no longer have to do that ridiculous and expensive quest line in order to unlock it, but that finally that stupid burning cart is gone from from the commerce exchange area. Hallelujah!

Blizz and hunters. MMO-C had an interesting blue post summary a couple of days ago. It was a thoughtful blue response to some Brewmaster Monk concerns from PTR players. It struck me because this is exactly the kind of responsive dialog hunters have been begging Blizz for ever since the early days of Legion’s closed beta.

Dozens and dozens of hunters have given Blizz exactly the same sort of thoughtful, observant comments we see from the monk poster in the cited blue post, and Blizz has steadfastly ignored every single one of them, has never once deigned to even recognize there are fundamental problems with hunter class mechanics. Yet we see this very respectful and in-depth response to Brewmasters. And it is by no means the first such — months ago there was a series of blue posts that painstakingly explained Blizz’s philosophy on the Brewmaster spec and outlined where they saw the spec going in the future, how they envisioned it should be played, et cetera and ad nauseaum. All because a few Brewmasters had expressed worries over their testing on the beta.

I was particularly touched by Blizz’s deep concern over the perceived Brewmaster angst with a clunky, hesitating play style. Here are a few astonishing excerpts (emphasis mine):

As you can imagine, the numbers for Blackout Strike’s cooldown and the CDR from Tiger Palm are very important to get right on this; we’ll tweak them and try a few things. We started out with the 4-beat cycle for PTR; we may also try the 3-beat cycle soon and see how that feels.

The common Blackout Combo-driven rotation right now is, in a way, not GCD locked, because it spends a significant amount of its time off GCD, but in practice it feels more like GCD locked, because that time is in between every few GCDs with little empty half-GCDs, adding a stutter to your rotation that we’re trying to clean up.


Brewmaster is not a particularly popular spec, and the awkwardness of their offensive abilities is one of the prime reasons why. That sort of thing is shrugged off by some people, really bugs some other people, and contributes to a general discomfort with a spec to most (and is usually hard for them to describe exactly why, falling back to works like ‘doesn’t flow’ or ‘clunky’).

Now, I am not trying to dump on Brewmasters who have done such a good job giving feedback to the devs, and I am sure they are correct in their assessment of the spec. Good on ’em. But,

What.

The.

Fuck.

Blizz is suddenly concerned about a slow, clumsy, stuttering play style??? They feel your pain, Brewmasters, over how the spec “feels”????

This is just unbelievable. Beastmaster Hunters have made similar comments for months, actually for over a year, and Blizz has not even tried to respond, has not in fact even admitted the play style stinks, has completely ignored every hunter comment to that effect. They dash off some quick easy tweaks, like give us back a couple of traps, or rework some Cobra Shot graphics, and call it good enough. But Brewmasters mention a little clunkiness and the devs fall all over themselves to try and fix it, expressing how concerned they are and how yes they completely understand, and oh no this is awful we simply must do something???

If we needed any further proof that Blizz considers hunters the throway class, one they simply cannot be bothered with, here it is.

Hello! Blizz, how about some hunter recognition for a change?

Mists of memory

What was your favorite expansion in WoW? Mine — and I know lots of people will disagree with me on this — was Mists of Pandaria. Looking back, it was the expansion where everything seemed to mesh in a seamless game experience.

Start with the story line. I am someone who is generally completely uninterested in the lore of this game, but I was intrigued by the whole Pandaren story, and honestly the pop culture pseudo-Eastern philosophy touches enhanced the experience for me. I rolled a panda monk, and I remember being delighted when the initial quest line revealed the nature of the starting island. I am an Alliance player through and through, but I liked the idea that Pandaren could choose their faction path upon leaving the island. I became very intrigued with the whole Wrathion enigma, and I am sorry we have not seen him since — I found him to be a compelling character.

I enjoyed — and still do — the racial “personality” of the Pandaren. It seems that Blizz really put a lot of effort into giving them a depth and complexity beyond anything I had experienced with other races in the game. Many of my characters are Night Elves, but honestly I never really gave much thought to them as a distinct people in Azeroth, for some reason they just have never made much of an impression on me beyond having a certain cosmetic look that I like.  But Pandaren are wonderful — individuals can be good or treacherous, fiercely loyal or despicably traitorous, wise or vapid. They are fierce fighters and make great soldiers, but they also love the hearth and make equally great innkeepers. They like good food and good beer and sharing it with any weary traveler.

I thought the monk class introduced in Mists was one of the most innovative Blizz has ever come up with. Each of the specs had unique and intriguing mechanics that were not just variations of every other class. My Panda monk was a mistweaver, and I really enjoyed the healing play style that was completely different from any other in the game at the time. She was also powerful enough in her damage dealing that I leveled as a MW and never had a problem. Legion’s Demon Hunters and the hunter Survival spec, in my opinion, pale in comparison to the creativity we saw with the monk class.

Starting the expansion, I remember being just blown away by the graphics. I found Pandaria to be breathtakingly beautiful. Every zone had one or more areas of surpassing wonder, and I still visit them when I need a break from the grind that has been WoD and Legion. I still enjoy swooping and soaring over the amazing beaches of Krasarang Wilds, and the windswept vistas of Kun-Lai Summit are balm to my soul. I have a particular fondness for Zouchin Village — something about the colors, the setting, the ambient sounds always makes me think of one of those glorious days in early spring, when you can smell the earth as it warms and see the first signs of new growth even though the air still has a slight taste of winter chill in it. If I ever quit this game, I will take each of my characters to Zouchin Village and let them end their existence there.

Certainly there were down sides to Mists, but in retrospect they were pretty tame. I thought the quest lines were coherent and connected with each other nicely. With the exception of Heart of Fear (I called it “Bugistan”), I liked the raids. I enjoyed scenarios. I loved that you could actually earn gear, not just roll the dice for it. I did not especially like the long rep grind that served as a gate to other aspects of the game, but in retrospect that was a piece of cake compared to Legion’s approach of making every character have to raid or run Mythic instances in order to advance any aspect of their end game play. I even kind of enjoyed the chase after the legendary cloak (except fo the PvP requirements), so much so that I got it on all but one of my alts.

Speaking of alts, I thought Mists was perfect for alt play. There was incentive to level them, because that is when you got flying for each, and I thought that was a fun reward for reaching level 90. There was also ample opportunity to actually play your alts, without the pressure of having to run instances or raids in order to do so. There were dailies, scenarios, and eventually there was Timeless Isle, where you could run dailies in 30 minutes or so — enough time to get some proficiency with your alts, but not so onerous as to feel like a grind (except for the frog killing zone, that is). You could max out alt professions with a single grind for faction rep, and then you could actually *gasp!* get some good out of your professions by crafting items or gathering mats for decent profit in the auction house. And you did not have to gear them all up to raid level gear in order to enjoy them.

I liked a lot of other miscellaneous things about Mists. I thought the Noodle Cart was fun and different, and I really liked being able to provide my raid group with noodles. (I think we could have predicted problems with Nomi, given what a little smart ass he was in Mists: “Who are you supposed to be?”) I actually liked getting individual rep with the Tillers in Valley of the Four Winds, and all of my alts became Besties with every Tiller, spending hours zooming around looking for dirt piles containing the treasures so dear to each of their hearts. I think much of this particular attraction for me was the reward of adding enhancements to Sunsong Ranch, a place I still like to spend a night in once in a while. It is the closest we have ever come — or sadly are likely to — to player housing in this game.

Mists was when I really came into my own as a Survival hunter. I spent hours practicing in front of the target dummies, I played with lots of rotations and talent builds. I learned how to configure and use Weakauras. I finally mastered the iconic hunter “turn around jump shot” by repeatedly running along the front of the Shrine, first practicing the “reverse disengage” mechanic — run, turn around and jump and DE and turn around again before landing — then adding in a Concussive Shot after the jump but before the disengage. I regret that this skill has deteriorated since then, but for a while I was pretty damn good at it. Survival was fantastic fun to play back then, possibly the zenith of hunter play in WoW. It makes me sad to compare it to BM play now in Legion.

So, yeah, I think Mists is the best expansion Blizz has given us. Unlike WoD and Legion, it seemed “finished”, like a well-designed final product, not like a drawing-board concept constantly being adjusted. I know a lot of people were frustrated that it dragged on for so long, but I was never bored with it, not even in the waning months. It was an expansion where I felt like all my goals were attainable, where I felt like I could set my own play parameters and have fun, whether it was in advancing my main or practicing with an alt or making some gold or just admiring the artwork. It seemed like an individual game back then, not like an assembly line.

Enough reminiscence. Time for a holiday weekend, with Zouchin Village spring weather.