Fog of war and other raid mechanics

Last week the folks at vanion.eu interviewed Blizzard encounter designer Morgan Day about some of the specifics and philosophies of raid mechanics for Tomb of Sargeras. If your German is as rusty as mine is, you can see the English crib notes and the interview at MMO-C. There was not a lot of earth-shattering news in the interview, although I did find a couple of things interesting, and Morgan Day was engaging, pleasant, and informative. Also, the interviewer, unlike a certain one I wrote about on Friday, stayed out of the conversation except when he needed to clarify some answers or elicit a bit more information.

The first thing I found interesting was the point about the interplay of technical development and raid mechanics. Day explained that, for example, when there was a new technical advancement that allowed for players to be moved around against their will, the devs incorporated it into raid mechanics such as the pushback in the Gul’dan fight. (And presumably also the use of this tech is what drove the inclusion of the strong winds mechanic in the Eye of Azshara instance.)

In Tomb, there is new tech that will allow for controlled decrease in transmitted screen clarity, something the devs are internally calling the Fog of War. This, Day explained, will be incorporated into at least one of the Tomb encounters to effectively limit a player’s vision and require assistance from team members to get through it.

I do not raid on the PTR, so I am as usual speculating from a position of pure ignorance. But I must admit I am a little worried about this. I have a slight sight disability (beyond what corrective lenses can help) and struggle with certain raid mechanics partially as a result of this. For example, I am terrible at dodging tornadoes and similar fuzzy-bordered constructs mainly because I do not have sufficient clarity of vision to see their edges. I never once made it through that maze in Durumu, even in LFR, despite running that raid dozens and dozens of times, adjusting my graphics settings, following someone who knew what they were doing, etc. Once in a while I still misjudge the edge boundaries of Skorpyron’s Focused Blast and get caught in it if I do not remember to overcompensate my distance. Vault of the Wardens is one of my least favorite Legion instances because of the dark foggy last part.

So when I am told there will be yet another vision-reducing mechanic in a raid, I am less than thrilled. I happen to think current raid mechanics are complex enough without adding in uncontrolled things like virtual simulation of cataracts. I may well be wrong, and it will turn out to be a fun mechanic, but honestly I feel like there is so much going on in any boss fight now that there is already plenty of confusion and “fog of war” without adding in more by screwing with our screen picture.

Peripherally connected to this “fog of war” mechanic were Day’s comments towards the end, that there are no plans to incorporate a “spectator mode” for raids. The reasoning, which I admit I had not thought of, is that some guilds might then designate a coach — someone who does not play but who instead directs the tactical fight. The reason this struck me as interesting is that it means Blizz is fully aware of how fantastically complex raid encounters have become, especially over the course of the last couple of expansions. (And there is the chicken/egg debate over whether encounters have become so complex because of addons that simplify them, or have addons proliferated because of the growing complexity.)

It also made me wonder — remember I am incredibly naive — if there is already not some form of this going on in esports. WoW has not thus far been a very active game for esports, but there are the occasional demos at special events. Certainly a guild or team could enlist the aid of a “spotter” in the audience, someone functioning like the ones NFL teams have — someone watching for patterns or problems from a place removed from the field, who could then use a communications line to inform/advise the coaches on the field. In fact, there seems to be no technical reason why world-first guilds now could not set up a video feed from one of their players’ screens to a “spotter” performing the same role Blizz is concerned about if they implement spectator mode.

I guess my point is, the “coach” excuse doesn’t really hold up as a reason to not go forward with a raid spectator mode. There might be technical or cost reasons, but coaching does not meet the test of logic as an excuse. If a guild wants to do it now, there is ample technology to set it up on their own — all that a spectator mode would do is make such a move more easily available to regular players.

The final thing that I found interesting about the interview was the rather short discussion of warforged and titanforged gear. The concern raised by the interviewer was that, with the chance of getting such gear from heroic raids, there might not be sufficient incentive to run mythic level. Day’s response was that, on average, more people will get higher level gear from mythic level than they will from the chance that heroic level loot will get a bump to mythic level.

The reason I found this interesting is that I remember that Oracle of All Things Fun, Ion Hazzikostas, prior to Legion, Blizzsplaining to us that the chance of getting warforged or titanforged gear from raids and dungeons would mean that your friends and guildies would be falling all over themselves to run that normal or heroic instance with you even though they were well beyond that in their progression, because they could get higher level gear.

HAHAHAHAHA! Good one, Ion. Not only has this not worked out as you said it would, but in fact now even one of your lead encounter designers has gone to some trouble to pooh-pooh the notion, hinting that the drop chance of getting mythic-level gear from a heroic encounter is hardly worth the trouble. In other words, Hazzikostas was stressing the mathematical possibility not the probability, whereas Morgan Day was actually being *gasp* realistic. But hey, according to the WoW Game Director, a one in a thousand chance or a one in a million chance is still a chance, and also very very fun™. So, Ion, tell me again why it is impossible to find a group for a normal instance, being as anyone could get really top-level gear from it?

Two weeks plus a day before we get to see for ourselves how this all plays out.

About Fiannor
I have a day job but escape by playing WoW. I love playing a hunter, and my Lake Wobegonian goal is to become "above average" at it.

2 Responses to Fog of war and other raid mechanics

  1. Marathal says:

    If the fog is anything like the final EN fight, note going to be anything I do more than once. The raids are far beyond me as it is any more. The constant additions of things requiring add on programs is out of hand.

  2. Just because you CAN shoot confetti all over the audience doesn’t mean you should. Remember when everyone was using Auto-Tune?
    Anyways, driving at night in the rain and passing a deer crossing sign was one of the most scary experiences of my life; not being able to see is darn scary.