Vacation

July 4th Flag

 

Meant to post this notice on Wednesday, but I will be taking a midsummer break from the blog starting today. Look for me back on Monday, July 10. Everyone in the US have a great and safe Independence Day.

 

Gear. Again. Still.

After a decent clear of Tomb of Sargeras (N) last night, I ended up with a new 910 ring and was able to complete my T20 4-piece. We had a lot of fun, and while we did not one-shot every boss, we did not have any real trouble with them either. Everyone is looking forward to Thursday night heroic progression. By all measures, it was a great raid night.

So why do I feel so incredibly frustrated? One word: Gear.

I know I have written about this before, so feel free to skip this post if you do not want to hear it again, but I have a sincere, heartfelt message for Blizz:

GEAR IS TOO FUCKING COMPLICATED!

For example, the 910 ring I got was by rolling on it when the player it dropped for did not need it. I rolled on it only because it was 10 ilevels higher than one of my equipped rings. When I won the roll, I suddenly realized I had no idea if it really was an upgrade for me or not. It had the right stats, but my equipped 900 level had a gem slot. My Pawn addon indicated the new one was an 8% upgrade, but a) I had not run a new sim in a couple of weeks, and b) Pawn indicates that about 80% of the gear I have in my bags would be upgrades, too, then when I change it out, the changed out gear somehow turns out to be upgrades, too. I ended up taking the ring and equipping it, but does it make much difference in my damage ability? I don’t have a clue.

However, rolling on the ring — angst-laden as it was — was the easy part. Once raid was over, I began the process of deciding which mix of legendaries, T19, T20, and other gear would be optimal. The factors to consider:

  • Several respected theory crafters out there advise that, for BM hunters, a mix of T19 2-piece and T20 4-piece should be the goal.
  • Certain BM legendaries still are preferred over others, but only under certain circumstances, such as what trinket do you have equipped, what talent build do you have, how many adds are expected in a given fight, and of course would equipping a legendary destroy the recommended tier set combo.
  • I had three 970 legendaries and enough Withered Essence to upgrade one more. Two of my 970 legendaries were for what are now designated tier slots.
  • No matter what, I was going to have to run multiple new sims with varying equipment mixes and talent builds.

Remember when Blizz said the reason they removed so many gear gem slots was because they wanted you to be able to equip new gear in a raid as soon as you got it?

HAHAHAHAHA! Good times…….

(If you have a few minutes, take a look at this Ten Ton Hammer recap of dev gear comments from Blizzcon 2014 — almost the complete opposite of where we are now.)

I ended up running something like 8 sims before I verified for myself that the main difference was in the gear-talent relationships. For BM hunters, and I suspect for nearly every other class/spec out there, certain legendaries play better than others with your tier set bonuses and with your talent build. Or to put it another way, a legendary that looks like it gives you a cool bonus may not in fact do so if you do not have complementary talents and other gear.

After over an hour of weighing, simming, switching talents, studying options, etc., I came to the sad conclusion that — despite my having the four top rated (whatever the heck that means) BM legendaries, only one was viable and the other equipped one would have to be the generic (and in most lists bottom of the heap for BM hunters) Kil’jaeden’s Burning Wish. Any other legendary combos I could configure would destroy one or both of my tier sets. So I reluctantly equipped it along with my legendary belt, and in fact used my upgrade on it. But it did not make me happy.

The other thing that really hit home for me while I was going through this process is that even all the gear helpers out there — addons and web sites — seem to consider only ilevel and to a limited extent generic secondary stats when recommending gear for you. Gem slots seem not to come into play, nor do tier set bonuses in most cases, much less the whole package of talent build and gear interactions. It’s too complicated for computers to evaluate in any kind of timely fashion. But apparently Blizz expects players to be able to do this on their own.

Realistically, most of the gear combos you try will make only maybe a less than 5% difference in your damage/healing/tanking. But they can make a huge difference in play styles (remember the pre-7.2.5 BM hunter shoulders?) and in a few instances they can make a significant numbers difference. The thing is, you usually won’t know unless you go through the complicated evaluation drill I went through last night — simming various combos of talents and gear.

This ratcheting up of complexity is in fact one of the things I was afraid would happen when Blizz fist announced the idea of artifact weapons and their interconnection with spec talents and abilities. The mathematical permutations rapidly spin out of control. Add in the exponential factors of tier sets and legendary bonuses, along with the normal complications of secondary stats and enhancements like gem slots, and you end up where we are today — it is virtually impossible for the ordinary player to know with any degree of certainty whether a piece of gear is an upgrade for them or not.

Blizz, if anyone out there is reading this, for the love of all you hold holy, I implore you, in the next expansion:

GO BACK TO A SIMPLE GEAR MODEL, ONE WHERE YOU DO NOT HAVE TO HAVE A Ph.D. IN MATH AND A BANK OF SUPERCOMPUTERS TO FIGURE OUT IF IT WILL BENEFIT YOU. 

Scattered thoughts on Friday’s dev AMA

After a very decent weekend, my head is not yet back into work mode, so all I can offer today is a bunch of scattered and unconnected thoughts. (Apologize in advance that these are not very coherent.) Friday there was a class design AMA on the WoW subreddit. If, like me, you did not follow it in real time, you can read it here. (Be warned that it goes on. And on. And on. And on. Possibly a tad bit more brevity enforcement by the moderators would have been beneficial. You can check out a Cliff’s Notes version at MMO-C here.) A few interesting tidbits:

There remains a lot of dissatisfaction with the MM hunter spec as it is currently set up.

Much of the expressed frustration dealt with the issue of pet vs petless, and the decision — at the 11th hour before Legion went live — to make Lone Wolf a talent (again). I do not play MM in Legion, but from what I could glean, a sizable number of MM hunters would like that entire talent row to be viable, rather than have LW be so vastly overpowered that there is really no choice. There is also a group that would like LW to be baseline, with the option to select a pet in a talent.

The other main track on MM hunters was on the Vulnerable mechanic.

There was also at least one plaintive cry for a perceived Blizz promise (I don’t ever recall one) to reinstate a ranged Survival play style within the MM spec. Nice to contemplate, but I do not see it happening.

Pets. Several people mentioned dissatisfaction with the “one size fits all” pet nerfing that occurred in 7.0. Gotta agree there — it just seems wrong to have all hunter pets be basically the same, the only real decision for pet selection coming down to a cosmetic/skin difference. The only exceptions are the battle rez/battle lust special pets, but those easy decisions really are a huge simplification of the kinds of pet abilities we used to be able to weigh. Later in the session, though, there was a hint that at least the devs understand hunter pets have been made a bit too bland:

We don’t have any solid plans currently [to adjust hunter pet utility], but I fully agree that we’re not in a great place right now. I would love to improve the situation. With the power of Battle Rez (Quilen) and Bloodlust (Core Hound), I don’t think I’ve used a different pet on my BM Hunter alt in PvE in a long time.

Many very good questions were simply ignored by the devs. Some I would have liked to have had answered (but weren’t) are:

  • Instead of a new class in the next expansion, is it possible we could see a lot of fourth specs, for example, a healing warlock, etc?
  • With the designs we are seeing Legion instances and raids, is multi-dotting obsolete?
  • Are there any plans to reinstate filler-type insta-casts for most ranged dps? Might such a move actually encourage more players to play ranged dps?
  • Why are warlocks limited to a pet-specific interrupt?
  • Will reforging ever make a comeback?
  • Any plans to fix the many remaining pet pathing issues for BM hunters?
  • Any plans to fix the really stinko Legion version of Stampede?
  • Any plans to give hunters more stable slots?

Some ominous dev comments:

We’d like to move into a direction where utility is more meaningful in all types of content, not even necessarily at the loss of performance. Players should be rewarded for making smart decisions that affect the success of their group as a whole, and we’d like to broaden that space.” To me, this is the current Blizz party line to return to a “Bring the class, not the player” approach.

I think BM Hunters aren’t far from being in a good place.” I think this means it is time for all BM hunters to press the panic button. Remember when the devs told us, before Legion, that “BM hunters are in a pretty good place now,” and then proceeded to completely rebuild the spec? Yeah, be afraid, BM hunters, be very afraid…

Anyway, I did think the AMA was interesting, though certainly devoid of any bombshell announcements. I was impressed with the detailed dev comments, when they chose to answer, and with the amount of time they took out of their day to participate. A little heavier hand on moderating might have resulted in more questions being answered.

Do yourselves a favor, though, read the MMO-C summary, don’t waste your time scrolling through the hundreds of pages of live comments.

When jokes become reality

Some years ago, Blizz published a particularly funny April Fool’s joke about a proposed new raid called the Tomb of Immortal Darkness. It was clever, and at the time we all yukked it up over the comic creativity of such an absurd notion.

Well.

Last night our raid team completed 9/9 (N) Tomb of Sargeras. The final boss, Kil’jaeden, demonstrates what happens when absurdity becomes reality. If you have not yet done it, there is one phase where in fact the Tomb of Sargeras becomes the Tomb of Immortal Darkness. Your screen goes almost completely dark, resembling the April Fool’s “video”. You in fact stumble around blindly, hoping to find first Illidan, then a healer, then one of several adds to kill. You are in total darkness beyond about five yards until all the adds die and the phase thankfully ends. If you do not find Illidan, you will die. Even if you find him, you must keep coming back to him periodically to refresh his magic juju on you, or you will die. If you do not bump into a healer, you will die.

The devs have been talking about this in interviews. Bragging, really, high-fiving about how brilliantly cool they are for using new technology to turn an April Fool’s joke into an actual raid! Bwaaahaahaa, they are technical and comic geniuses!

From now on, I will be scrutinizing all Blizz jokes very closely, trying to guess which new idiocy will find its way into the game.

I am sure there will be players who like this particular phase of Kil’jaeden, who will think it is great fun. My recommendation to them would be to have even more fun by taping a newspaper over their screen during their next raid — same basic effect, low-tech enough for home use.

We got through the phase by having whichever raid member stumbled upon Illidan mark his location with a map ping, then the healers congregated there and we all ventured out a ways in different directions and made liberal use of tab targeting to find and kill adds, darting back to the ping location every 15-20 seconds lest we die. However, if no one was lucky enough to find Illidan in the first place, we wiped. (Hint: While hunter flares do not work in the phase, DH Spectral Sight does, sort of. Not going to get into a Blizz-loves-them-best snark here, but yeah.)

This technique was spookily foretold in the original joke page when Blizz wrote:

Now this dungeon is finally seeing the light of day, we’re happy that all the hours we spent on it were worthwhile — over 9,00 on the “tab targeting” system alone!

This, to me, is not only a joke taken too far, but it is RNG taken too far. We have all experienced boss runs where RNG plays a wipe-or-kill role before, but those have been relatively few and they are based on things like who gets which debuffs at what time or bad luck with the timing of adds — that sort of thing. This seems different. Basically, if you are not lucky enough to randomly bump into crucial NPCs or adds or friendly players, you will wipe. Maybe there will be some clever addons (that Blizz will angrily declare “unfair advantages”) to help teams, and someone may stumble on to a sure-fire strategy, but there is no getting around the notion that Blizz has finally made a boss overtly dependent on a single RNG mechanic.

While there are a ton of other mechanics in Kil’jaeden, all but the April Fool’s joke gone bad seem eminently manageable in normal mode. There were long patches of 30 seconds or so where nothing was happening and we could concentrate on heaping damage on the boss, and conversely there were long periods where the boss became essentially untouchable and we only had to concentrate on mechanics. I haven’t looked at the heroic version yet, but I am betting in that mode those stretches will be filled with adds or other madness.

Once we had killed hm, I did find the final cutscene absorbing, with some great cinematography. I won’t spoil it for you (there are video spoilers out there already), but suffice it to say it is a nice reward for downing Kil’jaeden. (Good thing, too, as all I got was gold and an AP token as loot and bonus roll. 😡)

Tiny spoilerette: It also lingers for presumably the rest of the expansion, as it changes the Dalaran scenery for the characters that have completed it.

After finishing normal mode ToS, we went on to down a couple of the early heroic bosses before we quit for the night, so all in all it has been a great raiding week for our team. For me personally, it was terrific fun to get back into the part of the game I find most rewarding. I still expect this raid tier to quickly become routine, but for the next few weeks it will be, I think, a rewarding challenge.

And now, let the weekend begin!

Break’s over

Yay, last night we all got to dip a toe into Tomb of Sargeras, and it felt good to be back into a weekly raid schedule after the last few weeks of “What are we going to do tonight” and “cancelled” raid nights. Our approach is usually to run a couple nights of normal for a new raid tier, then start in on heroic progression. So last night we charged into normal ToS.

Stipulating that we are probably overgeared for it, and that we have excellent tanks and healers, I still expected it to be more challenging than it was. Most of us had read one or two summaries of each boss, maybe a couple people had watched a PTR video or two, and before each pull our RL gave us about a 1-minute rundown on the basic mechanics. (We had 16? 17? people.) Strategies were minimal, limited to those bosses that absolutely required splitting the team in two or something obvious. We wiped a couple of times but were 8/9 by the time we reached our raid end time. Some decent tier gear and trinkets dropped for quite a few people, although no one got a new legendary. All in all, it was a fun night.

Some initial observations:

  • The raid is, in my opinion, crazy complicated to navigate — doors, spiral staircases leading to dead end rooms, holes to jump down into, etc. We spent a significant amount of time just running around the place looking for the next boss, often circumnavigating the whole tomb in the process.
  • There are some excessively long runbacks after wipes/deaths. We were saved by having a couple warlocks, and we ended up just summoning people who rezzed and got hopelessly lost — A LOT. Blizz really needs to put in a few portals for getting back to bosses.
  • It is an inside raid, which means there is no opportunity to use (possible exception is the last boss) repair mounts. You engineers out there, start producing auto-hammers, because they are going to be in great demand while this tier is current. (Whatever happened to the practice of stationing repair NPCs just inside raids?)
  • There is heavy use of light/dark motifs throughout the raid. Several bosses require you to be aware of what “color” you are (magic, not race) and react accordingly. Example: there is even one passageway with different colored orbs you have to dodge, except you can hit any of the ones of the same color you originally ran into without damage. (I usually just ended up hitting Aspect of the Turtle and plowing through — too annoying to deal with.)
  • We first thought there was not a lot of trash to deal with — a nice break from Blizz’s recent fixation on mega-trash. However, it turns out this is only the case in the first wing. After that, there is tons of trash, and much of it hits really hard.
  • If you read up on each boss’s mechanics, you will shake your head in despair, because it seems almost impossible to deal with all of them. Don’t worry. When it comes down to it, at least in normal mode, they are actually much easier to deal with than you would think just by reading about them. More complicated to describe than to execute.

No clue how much trouble we will have with the final boss on Thursday, and I am relatively certain it will take us at least a couple of weeks to clear heroic once we start. Still, I suspect this raid tier will get to farm status relatively quickly, and very shortly we will be in the kill-time-before-7.3 mode.

WARNING! RED ALERT! RANT FOLLOWS! 

Speaking of killing time, I am going to go on a small rant here and complain, once again, about the whole ridiculous Legion legendary gear adventure. The latest stupid move is to make us work our tails off to upgrade the legendaries we have, just to get them to the same level as the ones currently dropping. And before I get tons of snarky you-just-want-everything-given-to-you mail, let me say, no, that is not the case. I don’t mind long quest lines or difficult challenges that lead to whatever achievement I am seeking — rather like them, in fact. And I do not think gear should be given out freely like candy. If you are someone doing high level content then you should get higher level gear than someone not doing that content. That seems obvious to me. (But I think you should actually get it, not merely be given the chance to roll the dice for it, but that is another topic.)

But people who have multiple legendaries — useful ones at that — by this time in the game will now have to spend weeks upgrading them to the same level as will fall in 7.2.5. I don’t have a feel for how fast the upgrade currency will fall, but I think an active end game player will probably be able to upgrade maybe one or one and a half per week. Some people (not me) have as many as 15 legendaries or more. To have to grind out the currency to upgrade these just seems petty and stupid. (Not even going to guess at how long it might take a non-raiding non-mythics alt to get an upgrade.)

And as for the inevitable argument of “Well, you can only wear 2 at a time, so in 2 weeks you could upgrade all you need”, no that is actually not the case. Blizz has spent a lot of time blizzsplaining to us that they want us to switch out our legendaries to fit different situations — that, they say, is the whole point of having so many different ones, to give us “choices” and “options”.

Why not, instead of grinding currency (a practice, btw, roundly and often condemned by Ion Hazzikostas), have us do a one-time quest line to get some kind of magic upgrade stone for all our legendaries? That would still have the intended gating effect, but it would reduce, in my opinion, the sheer annoyance of once again having to grind out game time for the “gift” of making your legendaries — which many of us have chased for months — current with the current game level. (In WoD, as I recall, the legendary ring automatically upgraded when there were significant gear upgrades.)

Making us “earn” a current level legendary was not onerous the last time it happened in Legion, because back then most people had only one or two legendaries, and they probably had them only on their main. True, a few had more, but they were the exception. But now, I suspect most active end game players have a lot of them. Blizz clearly took the lazy way out on this, re-using the previous mechanic and not considering how the situation has changed. It is, I feel, yet another cheap easy attempt to inveigle us to spend more time playing the game than we would normally spend, and call it “content”.

Okay, maybe that was not such a small rant. Sorry.

END RANT. WE NOW RETURN YOU TO YOUR REGULARLY SCHEDULED BLOG POST.

Anyway, as I was saying before I so rudely interrupted myself, I found ToS interesting, and getting back to raiding was a lot of fun. I don’t think the raid will age particularly well, but it is something interesting to spend a few weeks doing this summer. 

Gear and math

It’s been a nice relaxing couple of weeks in my WoW world. In my guild, we all took a break from what was becoming a very dull Nighthold raid circuit, and I seized the opportunity to work on a couple of alts — my balance druid and my destruction warlock. I find I enjoy playing them both, but the lock possibly a tad bit more than the druid. I still find the boomkin tedious for its long casts, but it gets better with better gear stacked for haste.

Both alts are hovering very close to ilvl 900 or a bit under, and the one thing that amazes me is how much better they are simply by virtue of having better gear. Trust me, in the last two weeks I have not suddenly become vastly more proficient on either one, but the difference in damage for both is pretty astounding. The only change has been upgraded gear. In some ways this is fun, because gear is relatively easy to get, even without subjecting yourself to LFR or mythic dungeons. But in other ways is seems kind of cheesy and not quite right. I guess it is an inevitable result of Blizz stepping away from the “bring the player not the class” philosophy — class/spec mechanics and gear seem to count for more and more these days. Nobody likes to blame gear for poor performance (well, okay, maybe some people like to), but that excuse is actually becoming more and more reasonable as Legion goes on.

I was thinking about this as I started last night to prepare my main hunter for resumption of raiding Tuesday when Tomb of Sargeras opens. Patch 7.2.5 brought some changes to BM hunters, and in spite of giving us a baseline 2-charge Dire Beast/Dire Frenzy, it is looking like overall we are in a worse place damage-wise than we were for Nighthold. Seems like Blizz just could not stand to have BM hunters close to the top, had to take away more than they gave. There will still be some class tweaks coming along in hotfixes, but honestly I am not holding my breath that any of them will include buffs for BM hunters.

At least two sites I read regularly have openly stated that MM is clearly — and by quite a ways — top of the hunter heap. From the IcyVeins BM hunter guide:

Now that 7.2.5 has released, we can say with reasonable confidence and assuming no major changes, that Marksmanship will be the optimal raiding spec going into Tomb of Sargeras, mostly due to the potency of its new set bonuses.

Beast Mastery remains a solid choice, though rather than being very competitive and sometimes even better at single-target than Marksmanship in ideal situations, it is now fair to say that its potential output is less than Marksmanship in nearly all situations.

And even the redoubtable Bendak, in his most recent BM post about Patch 7.2.5, is brutally realistic about BM, stating it will likely fall out not only in the middle of the damage pack, but likely in the lower middle at that.

Whatever. I am a hunter in WoW, that is who I am. And since Blizz has seen fit to destroy the essence of my vision of “hunterness” in MM and SV specs, I really have no choice but to continue playing BM. Numbers have never meant that much to me anyway, so what seems to be a sudden plunge from lower-top to lower-middle position is not a calamity. Some class/spec has to be in that position, it is the nature of rankings. Still, I will be interested to see what the actual numbers spread is when the ToS results start to become available. If the spread between top and bottom is large, then Blizz will have once again failed in its never-ending attempt to “balance” the class/spec mess they themselves caused.

My alt gear-centric push over the last couple of weeks also served to reinforce to me the utter insanity of Legion’s gear complexity. On my alts the calculus was relatively easy, since I never intend to actually raid with them: higher ilevel = good, secondary stats pretty much be damned. But when I started to weigh gear and talent combos on my main in preparation for ToS, I found myself once again despairing over the sheer mathematical enormity of the task.

It has gotten so bad that AskMrRobot is now implementing a SETI-like mass computer sharing approach to solving the gear problem for players. Mind you, modern computers already have pretty massive computing power. Certainly enough that even a middle-level server could perform general arithmetical comparisons, even for thousands of users at a time. But Blizz’s insane interdependencies of gear stats, talents, different types of raid bosses, RNG-dependent proc rates, and specialized legendary and set bonuses have gone exponentially past arithmetic calculations. To properly assess the relative value of gear, only massive computer simulations approach accuracy. One or two simulations at a time are handled (though slowly) on a home desktop computer, but if you are trying to do it for large numbers of players, you need vast computational resources, and the cheapest way to get them is to set up a distributed grid of community computers. (I applaud AMR’s ingenuity here, but honestly I would like to see a bit more detail on their app’s security setup before I open my computer to it.)

The point is, you need the power of modern computers to decide if a piece of WoW gear is actually an upgrade for you, or to decide which legendary works best with which set of talents. 

But Reforging was “too much math” for us.

🙄🙄🙄

See you after the release of ToS.

The crafted gear dance

One or two of you who regularly follow this blog may have noticed I did not post anything on Wednesday, thus departing from my usual M-W-F pattern. The truth is, I had a wonderful rant all written, full of my usual over-the-top indignant comments, along with some really creative metaphors. As I was about to publish, I saw the June 14 hotfix notes, and they effectively negated most of what I had just written. That, combined with a real life schedule for the day that did not allow for a rewrite, made me just trash the post and plan for another day.

So what was the topic that the hotfix notes ruined? Blood of Sargeras. Specifically, the fact that Blizz has stubbornly persisted in holding this mat as the main stumbling block for many profession- and gear-related activities in the game. They have done so by maintaining its soulbound quality, thus putting many players in the position of having a main with several hundred Bloods they cannot possibly use up, while alts that could use them cannot manage to scrabble enough of them.

The thing that gave rise to my renewed ire on the subject was that I have one alt with a lot of crafted gear equipped, but it has taken me weeks to get enough BoS to upgrade the six equipped items to max crafted level (875, prior to 7.2.5). The idea that it takes 2 BoS to use one obliterum effectively limits max level gear — in any quantity — to characters who have the profession levels to gather a lot of the mat, and thus probably do not need to use crafted gear. The alts that do need the gear almost never have the wherewithal to gather more than a few per week.

(This is yet another example of Blizz deliberately misleading us back when they announced Legion — “You can equip as many crafted items as you want, no more 3-item limit!” Same as the “No more limits on how many specs you can have!” All true in lawyer language, but complete falsehoods in reality. But that is a post for another time.)

At any rate, the Wednesday hotfix announcement that caught my eye was this:

(Hotfix in testing) Blood of Sargeras can now be obtained from Class Hall vendors at a price of 5 Blood of Sargeras for 5,000 Order Resources.

WOOHOO! Of course, the caveat “Hotfix in testing” could mean we will never see the change as it was announced, but still, it at least tells me Blizz seems to be aware of the problem the current method poses for alts and is working on a typically obscure way of remedying it.

As I wrote above, the main use of BoS I am concerned with is its connection to gear, more specifically its connection to the use of obliterum. Obliterum is, I think, another Legion mechanic that simply has not worked well. It is tedious to create and consequently expensive to buy in the auction house. Even if you can create or buy enough of it to upgrade an alt’s gear, it is doubtful the alt will have sufficient BoS to use it, unless the alt has a fairly well advanced gathering profession. The obliterum mechanic was slightly improved when Blizz got rid of that ridiculous and expensive quest line to unlock the forge, but that was at best a minor improvement.

The other really awful aspect of the whole obliterum mechanic is that it can only be applied to soulbound gear. This has a very detrimental effect on the entire crafted armor part of the game. Not only can you not craft and upgrade a piece of gear for one of your alts, but you are also limited to selling low level gear in the auction house. With the economic inflation introduced in the game by WoD garrisons and by the now-official gold selling, there are undoubtedly many players who would gladly pay good prices to buy max-level crafted gear from the auction house rather than go through the dance of buying low level gear, creating or buying obliterum, and then scrabbling for the BoS to be able to use their purchases. I am, honestly, mystified by the whole thing.

But the June 14 hotfix note, if actually implemented, would fix the problem, at least within an account. (Not for selling items.) It would mean you could transfer BoS from one character to another, though you would have to do a shuffle to do so. Since an alt with few opportunities to gather BoS likely also does not have order hall resources to spare, the method would be to buy order hall resources on your BoS-rich character, send them to your BoS-starved one, then have that character buy BoS with the order hall resources. Leave it to Blizz to do something like this rather than the easier, more straightforward fix which would be to make BoS account bound. Still, clunky and cumbersome though it is, it would work.

The other obliterum/crafted gear observation I have is how clumsily Blizz handled the 7.2.5 change to crafted gear upgrade level. Originally the announcement was that crafted gear would be upgradable to ilevel 885, two obliterum levels above the 7.2 ilevel. Thus it would take 10 instead of 8 obliterums (oblitera? maybe just obliterum in singular and plural) to max out the gear. So if you had currently maxed gear, you would need two obliterum and four BoS to do the new max. But when the patch went live, there was a stealth buff to crafted gear that maxed it at ilevel 900 instead of 885. But the total obliterum necessary to reach max level stayed at 10.

Stay with me here. What that meant was that everyone who had already spent 8 obliterum and 16 BoS to reach pre-7.2 max level suddenly had that retroactively changed to 5 (no refunds, of course, just a sort of historical rewrite of what you had done), and to reach the new max level they would be required to spend, not 2 obliterum and 4 BoS, but rather 5 obliterum and 10 BoS.

I am not complaining about crafted gear being upgradable to ilevel 900, but the implementation of this was a pretty dirty trick on players. Even those of us organized enough to anticipate the changes in 7.2.5 were caught unawares. I had in fact built up enough obliterum and BoS on my crafted-gear-heavy alt to upgrade all equipped pieces to new max as it had been announced prior to the stealth change. Imagine my surprise when I found out that it was not nearly enough. My stash of 12 obliterum and 24 BoS were no longer enough to upgrade all six equipped pieces, instead it was enough for only two. And by the way, the sudden change caused obliterum prices in the AH to skyrocket, more than 3 times their pre-7.2.5 prices on my server.

Overall, this is typical Blizz good-news-bad-news methodology. They give something with one hand, then take it away or make it less useful with the other. In the big picture, the crafted gear upgrades and possible vendor availability of BoS are positive developments. In the more immediate picture, the methods for doing those things are annoying.

And with that, since I have already screwed up my normal posting schedule for the week, I am going to take Friday off and start my weekend today. See you back here Monday.