Antorus – Not with a bang, but a whimper

Late Edit: After I published this piece, I realized I used the exact same poetic metaphor Bendak did in his post on hunter tier and trinkets in Antorus. This was entirely coincidental, but it looks cheesy, and I apologize to both Bendak and my readers for any appearances of literary sleaziness. 

This is the way the world ends
This is the way the world ends
This is the way the world ends
Not with a bang but a whimper.

T.S. Eliot, The Hollow Men

Tomorrow in the U.S. we will get the new raid, Antorus the Burning Throne. It is the last major raid tier in Legion and as such marks the beginning of the end of this expansion. As I am heartily sick of Tomb of Sargeras, I will be very glad to get into a new raid, and as usual I am looking forward to what I hope will be a lot of “tie up loose ends” time as soon as our raid team has completed heroic Antorus.

I did quite a lot of study and prep for the new raid over the weekend. (I did not try it out on the PTR.) From what I can see, it looks to have some interesting bosses, as well as some that I will undoubtedly hate. In particular, I am sure that I will suck at the mechanics of Eonar — the fight where you continually chase huge groups of adds around multi-level platforms and jump and fly between them. I am terrible at three-dimensional fights. It is a raid team joke about how often I fell to my death on the spider boss Elerethe Renferal in Emerald Nightmare. I never did master any of the older ones where you had to fly for a large portion of any fight — I am basically not able to translate a 2D screen into a 3D mindset, I guess.

The thing is, the Eonar fight seems tailor made for BM hunters — we have some adequate cc (now, though nothing like we had prior to Legion), and of course “unlimited mobility”. Though of course it is not in fact unlimited mobility, as we have a strictly limited number of ranged damage shots and the majority of our damage is bound to essentially a slow moving melee pet or pack of pets. And Blizz has greatly nerfed BM AoE damage over the course of Legion, to the point that if the mobs are not very tightly packed, forget it. We will see how this particular fight turns out, but I am not optimistic.

Still, as I said, I am looking forward to a new raid. From what I could see from my study, it looks like most Antorus bosses will require quite a lot of team coordination — more than other Legion raids. I like this, as it is very rewarding when a team finally syncs and downs a boss because everyone suddenly “got it”.

On the other hand, a team-centered set of mechanics makes it very difficult to switch out players or have raid drop-ins, because inevitably the drop-in players will cause a few wipes before they learn the team movement rhythm. If this happens during the progression phase, it can greatly extend the time required to complete the raid bosses. And sometimes it can be doubly frustrating when the team has the raid on farm, because it makes it seem like you are actually regressing because of multiple and constant wipes.

Anyway, I digress. The main point is, I am looking forward to the new raid, though not for the gear. For many classes — especially BM hunters — you can almost forget about shiny new tier gear that makes you more powerful. I am not going to go into details on this (check out Bendak’s rather dismal assessment of BM tier and trinkets in his latest post here), but suffice It to say I am not excited about the gear possibilities. I hope Blizz is at least embarrassed by their complete failure on the whole notion of tier gear in Legion — it seems incredible to me that, for several specs, gear from two tiers ago is still more powerful than the newest stuff. This situation more than any other speaks to the utter mess Blizz made with the whole complex gear/talent/bonus jumble they created and then were incapable of controlling.

In the coming months, there will be a lot of Legion retrospectives. I think in general the expansion will get a thumbs up from most people. As it should, though possibly it looks much better only because WoD was so awful. But on balance I think it will be judged to have been a good expansion, with a lot of very decent game advancements, including but not limited to Mythic+ instances, zone scaling, improved transportation methods (taxi whistle, shorter commercial flying routes, in-game portals), emissary quests and world quests, and a fast content pace.

The single greatest drawback, though, for me has been the endless grinding — for gear (including the horrible Legion legendaries), for artifact upgrades, for professions. Antorus — with its puny tier gear and introduction of yet another grind (in the form of the Antorus trinkets) is not really a grand finale to Legion, rather it is more a stretching out of an expansion feature that had already far outlived its novelty.

After this week we will likely have seen all there is to see in Legion. It seems like there will be no great final cosmic event like the explosion of Antorus the planet in the Azerothian sky, no victory parade for defeating the Legion, no medals or unit citations handed out, no welcome-home-to-the-heroes celebrations. Just grinding away until the expansion sputters out.

Though I have hated it on my main, grinding away on alts I have had precious little time for is at least a satisfying pastime, and one I will happily spend a few months doing. But it is not very spectacular. With apologies to T.S. Eliot, I would have preferred Legion to end “Not with a whimper but a bang”.

Ding dong, Kil’jaeden is dead!

IMG_0278Yup, we finally did it last night — downed Kil’jaeden on heroic. It was by the skin of our teeth, but we did it, and that Ahead of the Curve achievement was sweet. We had pretty much sailed through all the other bosses — our first H kill of Fallen Avatar was over a month ago — but KJ gave us trouble. I didn’t check the exact number of wipes, but it was somewhere between 90 and 100. It was no 600+ like Method’s Mythic kill, but it still was a pretty long slog for us. I suspect some of you out there killed him long ago on heroic, but trust me, for us there was definitely some hooting and hollering when he died.

I don’t play on a “raiding-heavy” server — it is technically an RP one — so we don’t have a lot of raiding heavy hitters to compete with, but I was still surprised to see we are only the 7th guild on the server to go 9/9 (H). We are not actually that far away from the next raid tier, maybe a couple of months. I honestly expected Blizz to nerf KJ on both normal and heroic by now, but they have not. Even for a final boss, he remains very challenging. We run normal Tomb once a week for alts and to help gear up non-raiders, and even on normal, KJ is tough for us unless some of us switch to our mains for that fight.

It is a difficult fight for a lot of reasons. For one, he has a hard enrage that serves as a dps check. For another, there are a lot of mechanics and at least in heroic they often come at you all at once. There is also a heavy RNG factor — you can wipe just because of how the mechanics randomly hit. And last but not least, it is what I think of as a “personal perfection” fight. That is, one small mistake on the part of an individual — healer, tank or damage dealer — can easily wipe the raid. There is no forgiveness for missteps, and generally speaking if you have 20-25 people, it is a virtual certainty that at least one of them will make a small error on any given attempt.

That last factor is probably the most challenging. Our raid team does not have a formal roster as such, we have a core group that almost always shows up, plus some others who are geared and proficient enough to raid with us regularly but who miss raids now and again. It is enough that we almost never have exactly the same team on any given night. KJ, certainly on heroic, does not really tolerate this kind of setup. To finally kill him, our RL had to formally limit the team to a smaller number (fewer people to make boo-boos) and to a more central core (more familiarity with how your teammates react). I don’t know if this was the key or not, but it was the setup we had when we finally killed him.

We have a fairly decent gear level as a team — somewhere around 930 or a bit under — but to kill KJ we also of course required flasks and pots, and we supplied feasts and Defiled Augment Runes for every attempt, and also handed out ToS vantus runes to everyone to attune them to KJ. We definitely pulled out all the stops.

In the end the kill included some pretty selfless sacrifices from some team members — for example our mage who kited the second flame ball by blinking into the rift, knowing he was already at low health and would die. Or people who selflessly racked up a couple or more debuffs from soaking meteors — because they knew letting one go spelled disaster for the team — even if it meant they would go into the dark phase at seriously low health. And our healers — well, they were magnificent. Tanks as usual were at the top of their game, something I have come to take for granted, but they really are continuously excellent.

For me, KJ remains one of the toughest final bosses. I did not raid in BC, so I can’t speak to those raids, but until this fight the hardest two bosses for raid teams I was on at the time were Ragnaros and Archimonde. I am pretty sure Kil’jaeden tops those, claiming the number one spot as my all time toughest challenge.

Anyway, short post today, going to give myself a little time to savor the euphoria!

If you are not in the path of Hurricane Irma, maybe send some positive thoughts in the direction of those who are. If you are in the path, please please please stay safe. See you all on the other side of the weekend.

Deja vu?

As we all know, Patch 7.3 will go live with the reset next week. Some people are wildly excited about it, others not so much. For myself, I am in a wait-and-see mode about it. On the one hand, I am impressed with Blizz’s lockstep adherence to their stated release goals for Legion patches and raid tiers. I have to admit, when they announced them for Legion I was very skeptical that they would be able to keep up, and that soon we would be in another dire WoD dearth situation. Let’s face it, their recent track record up until Legion was pretty grim. But they have thus far been true to their words, and I hereby eat mine. My following comments notwithstanding, Legion is by any measure a success story for Blizz and for WoW players.

That said, my “on the other hand” comment about 7.3 is about BM hunters. I am starting to get an uneasy, gnawing feeling in my gut about Blizz’s intentions for the spec. Since the first round of class adjustments in 7.1.5 (the one where all hunter specs got their traps back), Blizz has either nerfed BM or ignored it while they buffed many other classes. When they have given us a buff, as in 7.2.5 when they gave us as baseline 2 charges of Dire Beast/Dire Frenzy, they have subsequently taken it away with larger nerf chunks — like the terrible T20 bonuses that made T19 remain the tier of choice for many many ilevels. The net effect — nerfs, leaving it alone while other classes receive buffs — has been that BM has been systematically relegated to lower and lower damage tiers. And this will apparently continue in 7.3. (Check out Bendak’s 7.3 BM outlook here, it is excellent reading.)

In my mind, this systematic downgrading of BM is eerily similar to what Blizz did to SV hunters in WoD. There, after SV was found to be wanting at the beginning of the expansion, they buffed the spec in the first major patch, found they had made a big mistake by making the spec so responsive to the secondary stat Multistrike, decided it was too much trouble to fix the stat mess, so in subsequent patches purposely nerfed SV into the ground in order to make it unplayable for the remainder of the expansion. They did this because they intended to eliminate the spec entirely in Legion, and make a melee spec with the same name. (Of course, they never breathed a word of this to bewildered SV hunters left high and dry in WoD.)

What we are seeing with BM in Legion is not exactly the same as the WoD SV pattern, but it is close enough to give me pause. BM started out Legion on the lower end of the damage spectrum, became a bit OP after 7.1.5 with the combination of tier and a couple of legendaries, and when Blizz realized what they had done they seemed to deliberately embark on a nerf spiral for the spec, with no word of explanation or intent. Are they, in fact, planning yet another huge betrayal of hunters — this time BM hunters — in the next expansion?

I have said before that most of my initial objection to BM in Legion had to do with play style and not numbers. I stand by that, and although I still dislike the general press-the-button-on-CD method, Blizz has added a small amount of complexity to the rotation that helps. Basically, I have made my peace with it.

And while I am not a meter hog, I do understand that numbers matter because of perception. It’s in some ways a self-fulfilling prophecy that if a particular spec is thought to be weak then fewer top level players will play it, thus the spec will sink even lower on the summary charts because almost no experts are playing it, etc. And one of the initial reasons people will consider a spec to be weak, like it or not, are simulation results. These have a lot of flaws, but they do have one overriding feature: for a given spec, talent and gear build, and type of fight, they will show the maximum damage potential. Absent a lottery-winning run of proc luck, almost no player in those same circumstances can hope to do better than the sim number, no matter how perfectly they may play. Now of course for any given raid there is almost never a simulation set of circumstances present. Still, the sims do give a very general benchmark of what to expect from a spec.

More to my point, when the sims as well as the actual damage charts have a spread of over 300k between the top and bottom specs, then in my opinion we are in a situation of class imbalance that implies there are definite winner and loser specs. Try though they may, Blizz has thus far failed to bring about true class balance in Legion, feel-good comments by the Game Director notwithstanding.

We can quibble about the exact damage position of BM hunters in 7.2.5 and going forward, but both the charts over time as well as my own anecdotal observations show a definite downward trend. I used to routinely be in the top 5-6 damage dealers in my raid, for example, but over the last month or more it is far more usual for me to only be in the top 10 or even 12. (Which is not very encouraging considering we usually run with only 12-15 DPS.)  Some of this is due to the nature of the bosses in Tomb of Sargeras, and on a couple of bosses may just be my slow learning curve, but some of it is also due to Blizz’s failure to design BM hunters to scale with gear as well as other classes do. This is a clear class balance design flaw, possibly not limited to BM hunters, but that is the spec I pay attention to.

So yeah, I am starting to get worried about the future of BM hunters. I was confused and angry when they nerfed my beloved SV hunter into the ground in WoD, and I certainly did not catch on at the time to their intent. But I am older and wiser now, and I am beginning to suspect I have seen this show before. Fool me once, etc. I will be scrutinizing every word Blizz has on hunters as we move forward, into 7.3 and beyond.

Now I believe beer is in order. Enjoy your weekend.

7.3 precursors

The final wing of Tomb of Sargeras for LFR opened yesterday. I could not face what I knew was going to be a poop show, so I did not venture in with any of my alts — didn’t even consider doing it on my main — but some of my guildies did, and they came away either laughing themselves silly or dazedly shaking their heads, depending on their personal reactions to LFR in general. The forums, predictably, are full of comments ranging from outrage over how hard it is to outrage over what idiots everyone is except the poster of course who is actually the best player in the history of WoW.

As I said, I have no first hand knowledge of the LFR Kil’jaeden fight, but it sounds about the same as the LFR Archimonde fight in WoD — wildly hard until most of the LFR population gains a group understanding of the mechanics, then somewhat better as crowd proficiency improves. I do know from experience that KJ is very challenging on both normal and heroic, and we all read about the problems Method had on mythic. So we can stipulate that KJ is crazy hard, even on LFR.

Blizz has wobbled around a lot on LFR ever since its inception. Game Director Hazzikostas admitted this in the most recent Q&A, when he stated there was no longer a desire — presumably on Blizz’s part — to make LFR “tourist mode”. You will recall that this had been the original intent of LFR — basically a low-pain way for people who chose not to raid with a regular team to experience some end game content and story lines without committing to the demands of regular raiding. It was in fact designed to be ridiculously easy. Now, it seems, that is no longer desirable.

The other historic thing about LFR is that Blizz at one time indicated it should have all the same mechanics as normal and heroic but way less demanding. That way, if players wanted to preview and/or practice for harder modes they could do so. But of course that was back when Blizz’s philosophy on raid levels was that the mechanics should not change, only the damage levels.

But now apparently “tourist mode” — formerly a good thing — is a bad thing, and changing mechanics — formerly a bad thing — is a good thing.

I don’t run LFR often enough any more to really have an opinion on the constantly changing Blizz design philosophy on it. However, it does strike me that there are limits to how “challenging” you can make a raid composed of 25 strangers, some of whom are conscientious and do their best and some whom simply do not give a shit. Some are pretty proficient at their roles and some have no clue what buttons to press, much less where to stand so as not to die. Some are there for accomplishments and gear and some are there just to screw with everyone else.

The group you get in LFR is the ultimate RNG. (With the added benefit that you can keep rolling a new one simply because people lose patience and drop group, so that you are in effect constantly rerolling the group composition until you finally get a winning combo.) So to be honest I am not sure how useful it is to, for example, keep the dark phase of Kil’jaeden where no one can see anything and you have to run around in pitch darkness trying to find the safe zone — hoping you do not fall off the edge in the process –and then venture out for a few seconds to find and kill adds. Some people in LFR will never be able to do this, just as some people will never soak the meteors, either because they don’t understand the mechanic or because they are ass hats. Time will tell if KJ is overtuned for LFR, but I think I will wait until it’s a bit less chaotic before I venture in.

Blizz has a habit of setting up major parts of the game with a clearly-stated design purpose, only to completely reverse that purpose in short order for no apparent reason other than some dev doesn’t like it. There is something to be said for flexibility and for the willingness to remake the game frequently, but there is also something to be said for keeping implied promises. I really don’t know if I would call the constant swings of LFR breaking a promise, but I wonder exactly who the target player group is for it. I think Blizz wonders, too, and I think every time they rethink the question they change LFR tuning.

There is a sizable group of players for whom LFR is their only participation in raiding. It is their endgame. I have the feeling these players go into it trying to do their best, trying to deal with mechanics, trying to improve their proficiency, in the same way as any other raider. Hazzikostas indicated Blizz is trying to tune LFR for this group of players. I guess we will see if the effort is futile or not, given the large number of morons and jerks who also run only LFR.

Here’s the problem with constant re-evaluation of LFR’s purpose: If people consider it “tourist mode”, then it attracts a large number of players who think it is a big joke, who think nothing of going afk for most of it, who disdain mechanics, who do whatever they can to pull every trash mob, who think it is funny to wipe the raid, who consider it fine to have no idea how to play their class. So when Blizz tries to change the “tourist mode” approach to make it more challenging, the perception of it being a cakewalk persists, thus those same undesirables keep running it. Which of course becomes increasingly frustrating to those who want it to be something more. Maybe over time Blizz can change the popular notion that LFR is a total joke, but it is not going to be an easy transition.

As a related event to opening the final wing of ToS for LFR, the giant imploding planet Argus is now visible in the sky to everyone instead of just to those who have killed KJ on normal or higher. As I have mentioned before, I am not really overjoyed at the prospect of Argus for our 7.3 venue. What I have seen of it, it seems pretty much to be a rehash of the depressing nothingness of Broken Shore. It might turn out to be terrific, but I am not encouraged by the ever-present specter of a planet in its death throes. Just does not seem likely such a planet will yield hours of pleasant exploration and idyllic excursions to scenic overlooks.

And the Doomsayers are back. Whatever the hell those are. I never understood what the point of them was when we saw them at the end of WoD, and I don’t understand them now. I always thought a doomsayer was that one kid in grade school who, when we had to go into the basement because of a tornado warning, would tell us all in somber tones that we were probably going to die. Kind of a less-cute Eeyore. I never thought of it as a professional calling, which is apparently what it is at certain times in WoW. I also don’t get the whole pamphlet thing and why dying repeatedly is desirable, or why there are periodic breathless announcements in trade chat about the location of this or that doomsayer, followed by a player stampede to that location.

In other words, regarding Doomsayers: Huh?

At any rate, opening the final LFR wing in this raid tier, along with other factors like announcing the end of the PvP season, weirdos wandering the streets of Dalaran,  and a big honking fire planet in the sky all point to 7.3 going live sometime around the end of this month. Legion moves on.

Impossible odds and imbalance?

I am sure most of you already know, but Method successfully downed Kil’jaeden to claim Mythic World First for Tomb of Sargeras. They did it after 653 wipes, which follows their 400+ wipefest for Fallen Avatar. I don’t know the record for these kinds of things, but I am suspecting that over a thousand wipes for the last 2 bosses is in itself a World First title. Whether you think a pursuit like this is a good use of one’s time or not, you have to be a little bit in awe of the commitment and sheer stubbornness it takes to accomplish it. I am not a big fan of Method, but there is no doubt that hearty congratulations are in order.

So the number of wipes is pretty mind-boggling and causing not a few comments in the WoW blogosphere. The other thing causing comments is the composition of the 20-man Mythic team. Among some of the noteworthy items: 5 druids, 5 rogues, 3 hunters. Classes absent were mages, monks of any flavor, death knights, and demon hunters. Two of the druids were Balance spec, and all of the hunters were MM. The melee DPS consisted entirely of rogues and two warriors.

As you might suspect, there is a river of speculation as to The Future of The Game based solely on this one event. Much of it is overblown, of course, but I do think there are a few valuable insights we can derive from it — at least from the little we know of the actual tactics so far.

For one thing, it strikes me that 653 wipes is way more than these elite players need in order to learn a fight. We are talking about people who live and breathe this game, who have genius-level reaction times, who have almost uncanny “raid sense”, who have raided together so much that they know each other’s reactions as well as their own, and who have been preparing for this fight since at least the early PTR days of 7.2.5.

For a team like this to wipe 653 times tells me that the fight is essentially unwinnable, but that there is a small random chance every mechanic will work out to the team’s benefit. If the team can put together a flawless performance when that happens, they can beat the boss. It is not about being world-class good, it is about being world-class good every single time, so that when favorable RNG finally happens, the boss goes down.

This takes nothing away from Method — it is no small feat to achieve consistent performance perfection. But I do think it takes away from Blizz’s tier design, because it renders ludicrous the baseline assumption that raids allow players to progress as a character and as a team. To beat this boss, Method on average had to outgear the loot — average gear level over 933 for a raid that awards 930 level gear. And let’s be honest, any kind of team esprit or group learning occurred long before the ultimate win.

Eventually, Mythic ToS will be nerfed, and it will be attainable by non-World First kinds of guilds, the ones that are hard-core raiding guilds (think realm-first levels) but not necessarily the ones who dedicate their entire waking existence to it for weeks at a time. It might even be nerfed enough so that a few of the early bosses become beatable by guilds such as mine — after we greatly overgear it. I don’t know what that says about raid difficulty levels, but I think it is safe to say we have gone beyond the LFR-Normal-Heroic-Mythic model. It’s almost as if we now have two levels of the four-level model — one version early in a patch and another sinmpler version later in the patch. And it definitely says that Blizz is more concerned with hyping World-First competitions than it is with setting a difficult but attainable goal for regular raiding guilds. (They’ll fix that shortfall after they have milked the hype…) Also, possibly, that they have signed on to RNG as a viable raid mechanic.

As to the other notable aspect of Method’s victory — team composition — I am not sure what to make of it. We will learn more of the reasoning behind it once we can see a video, and as Method speaks more freely about it. I do not think it should be news to anyone that Blizz has completely abandoned the “Bring the player not the class” philosophy, nor should it come as a surprise that the current state of class imbalance has given us superstars and losers in the class/spec lottery.

What gives me pause is how much of this philosophy and actual state of affairs will filter down to the majority of raid teams, and what effect it might have on player perceptions of “winner” and “loser” classes/specs. Certainly guild teams such as mine that raid for fun not profit will remain largely unchanged, especially since they rarely run Mythic level and are thus not bound into a strict 20 players. I suppose some realm-first guilds may decide to reorganize their rosters, but that will not affect a lot of players.

We have seen backlashes before, mainly in pugs, when certain classes/specs are deemed inferior, even if the perceived inferiority is only for certain fights under certain circumstances. Such backlashes can result in unhappiness among players, and unhappy players tend to switch specs to be the flavor of the month, to just quit the game, or to gripe loudly in forums and other communications venues, demanding their now-unpopular class/spec be buffed enough to be “competitive”.

I expect to see an uptick in the number of Balance druids, rogues, and MM hunters in the next few weeks, simply as a result of Method’s raid roster for the KJ kill. It is not logical, but it almost certainly will happen. I also expect there to be some amount of unfair discrimination against a few classes for pugs — possibly some against non-bear tanks, mistweaver healers and tanks, maybe BM hunters. And some of the forums will undoubtedly light up with demands for buffs — pretty much the same forums as the classes omitted from Method’s roster. (There are already buffs in the works for some of these classes, so Blizz may get off easy on them.)

But I still think it way too early to make any sweeping inferences about class balance based just on Method’s team roster for this kill. It was a special circumstance, a fact that will almost certainly elude many people. On the other hand, I do think it is appropriate to think about the stunning number of wipes involved, and what that might say about Blizz’s current approach to raid development.

 

When jokes become reality

Some years ago, Blizz published a particularly funny April Fool’s joke about a proposed new raid called the Tomb of Immortal Darkness. It was clever, and at the time we all yukked it up over the comic creativity of such an absurd notion.

Well.

Last night our raid team completed 9/9 (N) Tomb of Sargeras. The final boss, Kil’jaeden, demonstrates what happens when absurdity becomes reality. If you have not yet done it, there is one phase where in fact the Tomb of Sargeras becomes the Tomb of Immortal Darkness. Your screen goes almost completely dark, resembling the April Fool’s “video”. You in fact stumble around blindly, hoping to find first Illidan, then a healer, then one of several adds to kill. You are in total darkness beyond about five yards until all the adds die and the phase thankfully ends. If you do not find Illidan, you will die. Even if you find him, you must keep coming back to him periodically to refresh his magic juju on you, or you will die. If you do not bump into a healer, you will die.

The devs have been talking about this in interviews. Bragging, really, high-fiving about how brilliantly cool they are for using new technology to turn an April Fool’s joke into an actual raid! Bwaaahaahaa, they are technical and comic geniuses!

From now on, I will be scrutinizing all Blizz jokes very closely, trying to guess which new idiocy will find its way into the game.

I am sure there will be players who like this particular phase of Kil’jaeden, who will think it is great fun. My recommendation to them would be to have even more fun by taping a newspaper over their screen during their next raid — same basic effect, low-tech enough for home use.

We got through the phase by having whichever raid member stumbled upon Illidan mark his location with a map ping, then the healers congregated there and we all ventured out a ways in different directions and made liberal use of tab targeting to find and kill adds, darting back to the ping location every 15-20 seconds lest we die. However, if no one was lucky enough to find Illidan in the first place, we wiped. (Hint: While hunter flares do not work in the phase, DH Spectral Sight does, sort of. Not going to get into a Blizz-loves-them-best snark here, but yeah.)

This technique was spookily foretold in the original joke page when Blizz wrote:

Now this dungeon is finally seeing the light of day, we’re happy that all the hours we spent on it were worthwhile — over 9,00 on the “tab targeting” system alone!

This, to me, is not only a joke taken too far, but it is RNG taken too far. We have all experienced boss runs where RNG plays a wipe-or-kill role before, but those have been relatively few and they are based on things like who gets which debuffs at what time or bad luck with the timing of adds — that sort of thing. This seems different. Basically, if you are not lucky enough to randomly bump into crucial NPCs or adds or friendly players, you will wipe. Maybe there will be some clever addons (that Blizz will angrily declare “unfair advantages”) to help teams, and someone may stumble on to a sure-fire strategy, but there is no getting around the notion that Blizz has finally made a boss overtly dependent on a single RNG mechanic.

While there are a ton of other mechanics in Kil’jaeden, all but the April Fool’s joke gone bad seem eminently manageable in normal mode. There were long patches of 30 seconds or so where nothing was happening and we could concentrate on heaping damage on the boss, and conversely there were long periods where the boss became essentially untouchable and we only had to concentrate on mechanics. I haven’t looked at the heroic version yet, but I am betting in that mode those stretches will be filled with adds or other madness.

Once we had killed hm, I did find the final cutscene absorbing, with some great cinematography. I won’t spoil it for you (there are video spoilers out there already), but suffice it to say it is a nice reward for downing Kil’jaeden. (Good thing, too, as all I got was gold and an AP token as loot and bonus roll. 😡)

Tiny spoilerette: It also lingers for presumably the rest of the expansion, as it changes the Dalaran scenery for the characters that have completed it.

After finishing normal mode ToS, we went on to down a couple of the early heroic bosses before we quit for the night, so all in all it has been a great raiding week for our team. For me personally, it was terrific fun to get back into the part of the game I find most rewarding. I still expect this raid tier to quickly become routine, but for the next few weeks it will be, I think, a rewarding challenge.

And now, let the weekend begin!

Break’s over

Yay, last night we all got to dip a toe into Tomb of Sargeras, and it felt good to be back into a weekly raid schedule after the last few weeks of “What are we going to do tonight” and “cancelled” raid nights. Our approach is usually to run a couple nights of normal for a new raid tier, then start in on heroic progression. So last night we charged into normal ToS.

Stipulating that we are probably overgeared for it, and that we have excellent tanks and healers, I still expected it to be more challenging than it was. Most of us had read one or two summaries of each boss, maybe a couple people had watched a PTR video or two, and before each pull our RL gave us about a 1-minute rundown on the basic mechanics. (We had 16? 17? people.) Strategies were minimal, limited to those bosses that absolutely required splitting the team in two or something obvious. We wiped a couple of times but were 8/9 by the time we reached our raid end time. Some decent tier gear and trinkets dropped for quite a few people, although no one got a new legendary. All in all, it was a fun night.

Some initial observations:

  • The raid is, in my opinion, crazy complicated to navigate — doors, spiral staircases leading to dead end rooms, holes to jump down into, etc. We spent a significant amount of time just running around the place looking for the next boss, often circumnavigating the whole tomb in the process.
  • There are some excessively long runbacks after wipes/deaths. We were saved by having a couple warlocks, and we ended up just summoning people who rezzed and got hopelessly lost — A LOT. Blizz really needs to put in a few portals for getting back to bosses.
  • It is an inside raid, which means there is no opportunity to use (possible exception is the last boss) repair mounts. You engineers out there, start producing auto-hammers, because they are going to be in great demand while this tier is current. (Whatever happened to the practice of stationing repair NPCs just inside raids?)
  • There is heavy use of light/dark motifs throughout the raid. Several bosses require you to be aware of what “color” you are (magic, not race) and react accordingly. Example: there is even one passageway with different colored orbs you have to dodge, except you can hit any of the ones of the same color you originally ran into without damage. (I usually just ended up hitting Aspect of the Turtle and plowing through — too annoying to deal with.)
  • We first thought there was not a lot of trash to deal with — a nice break from Blizz’s recent fixation on mega-trash. However, it turns out this is only the case in the first wing. After that, there is tons of trash, and much of it hits really hard.
  • If you read up on each boss’s mechanics, you will shake your head in despair, because it seems almost impossible to deal with all of them. Don’t worry. When it comes down to it, at least in normal mode, they are actually much easier to deal with than you would think just by reading about them. More complicated to describe than to execute.

No clue how much trouble we will have with the final boss on Thursday, and I am relatively certain it will take us at least a couple of weeks to clear heroic once we start. Still, I suspect this raid tier will get to farm status relatively quickly, and very shortly we will be in the kill-time-before-7.3 mode.

WARNING! RED ALERT! RANT FOLLOWS! 

Speaking of killing time, I am going to go on a small rant here and complain, once again, about the whole ridiculous Legion legendary gear adventure. The latest stupid move is to make us work our tails off to upgrade the legendaries we have, just to get them to the same level as the ones currently dropping. And before I get tons of snarky you-just-want-everything-given-to-you mail, let me say, no, that is not the case. I don’t mind long quest lines or difficult challenges that lead to whatever achievement I am seeking — rather like them, in fact. And I do not think gear should be given out freely like candy. If you are someone doing high level content then you should get higher level gear than someone not doing that content. That seems obvious to me. (But I think you should actually get it, not merely be given the chance to roll the dice for it, but that is another topic.)

But people who have multiple legendaries — useful ones at that — by this time in the game will now have to spend weeks upgrading them to the same level as will fall in 7.2.5. I don’t have a feel for how fast the upgrade currency will fall, but I think an active end game player will probably be able to upgrade maybe one or one and a half per week. Some people (not me) have as many as 15 legendaries or more. To have to grind out the currency to upgrade these just seems petty and stupid. (Not even going to guess at how long it might take a non-raiding non-mythics alt to get an upgrade.)

And as for the inevitable argument of “Well, you can only wear 2 at a time, so in 2 weeks you could upgrade all you need”, no that is actually not the case. Blizz has spent a lot of time blizzsplaining to us that they want us to switch out our legendaries to fit different situations — that, they say, is the whole point of having so many different ones, to give us “choices” and “options”.

Why not, instead of grinding currency (a practice, btw, roundly and often condemned by Ion Hazzikostas), have us do a one-time quest line to get some kind of magic upgrade stone for all our legendaries? That would still have the intended gating effect, but it would reduce, in my opinion, the sheer annoyance of once again having to grind out game time for the “gift” of making your legendaries — which many of us have chased for months — current with the current game level. (In WoD, as I recall, the legendary ring automatically upgraded when there were significant gear upgrades.)

Making us “earn” a current level legendary was not onerous the last time it happened in Legion, because back then most people had only one or two legendaries, and they probably had them only on their main. True, a few had more, but they were the exception. But now, I suspect most active end game players have a lot of them. Blizz clearly took the lazy way out on this, re-using the previous mechanic and not considering how the situation has changed. It is, I feel, yet another cheap easy attempt to inveigle us to spend more time playing the game than we would normally spend, and call it “content”.

Okay, maybe that was not such a small rant. Sorry.

END RANT. WE NOW RETURN YOU TO YOUR REGULARLY SCHEDULED BLOG POST.

Anyway, as I was saying before I so rudely interrupted myself, I found ToS interesting, and getting back to raiding was a lot of fun. I don’t think the raid will age particularly well, but it is something interesting to spend a few weeks doing this summer.